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  1. #1
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    Mar 2006
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    Grab Forty Winks

    Hello

    My name is Marta. I'm Spanish. It's the first time I svisit your site. I speak some English and I'm trying to read the short story "Brokeback mountain" in its original version but it's being quite difficult. There's lots of texan or cowboy idioms that I haven't found in any of the dictionnaries I've looked up:

    he had put him on the woolies

    i'll grab forty winks

    run full throttle on all roads whether fence mending or money spending

    you are going to go where you look

    wouldn't give me a dime if I dropped it, except one way

    I gave him a look

    He had suddenly swung from the deck and laid the ministering angel out in the wild columbine, wings folded

    You weren't getting paid to stem the rose

    I know the words but not the meaning of the sentences. I'll be really grateful if you could help me to understand them.

    Thank you in advance.

    Marta

  2. #2
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    Feb 2006
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    Re: Grab Forty Winks

    I must confess, I've neither seen nor read Brokeback Mountain. Ah, well.

    The only idiom I can positively identify here is "grab forty winks", which means "to go to sleep for a short while". "Forty winks" is a short sleep, usually during the day. That's quite a common idiom -- at least, it's common in Britain.

    "I gave him a look" would mean "I looked at him in a certain way", but what that certain way might be I can't tell without looking at the context.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2006
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    Re: Grab Forty Winks

    Hi Martica,

    Apart from the two Rewboss has mentioned, these are peculiar Texan idioms with which I'm not familiar either. It would be helpful if you could post the full sentences, and we'd probably be able to tell you from the context.

    "run full throttle on all roads whether fence mending or money spending" - "run full throttle" means to do something with great enthusiasm, and "fence-mending" as an idiom means reconciling an argument, although in the context of a book about cowboys it could mean literally mending fences.

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