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  1. #1
    LiuJing is offline Member
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    Default It's too heavy for me to lift (it) up.

    It's too heavy for me to lift up.

    It's too heavy for me to lift it up.

    -------------------------------

    I know in Sentence 2, the first 'it ' could be a formal subject pronoun, and the second 'it' refers to the actual object to be lifted. In Sentence 1, the 'it' refers to the object to be lifted. Which sentence sounds more natural to you? Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: It's too heavy for me to lift (it) up.

    It's too heavy [for me] to lift.

    No "it." No "up."

    You can omit "for me" if it's clear that you're talking about yourself.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    LiuJing is offline Member
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    Default Re: It's too heavy for me to lift (it) up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's too heavy [for me] to lift.

    No "it." No "up."

    You can omit "for me" if it's clear that you're talking about yourself.
    It would sound stilted with 'up' and 'it', right?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: It's too heavy for me to lift (it) up.

    It would not sound "stilted." It's just not what most natives I know would say. We usually don't repeat the subject as the object.

    You can also say:
    I can't lift it. It's too heavy.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: It's too heavy for me to lift (it) up.

    In BrE, you will hear "lift up" as well as "lift".

    Can you lift me up? No, you're too heavy.
    Why is that box still on the floor? It's too heavy for me to lift [up].
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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