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  1. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #1

    Exempt(ed) vs. except(ed)

    Which one is correct?

    Exempt(ed) (from this) are additional mileage, additional features and additional insurance.

    Excepted (from this) are additional mileage, additional features and additional insurance.


    Can I omit "from this" in this sentence?

    Thank you!

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Exempt(ed) vs. except(ed)

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Which one is correct?

    Exempt(ed) (from this) are additional mileage, additional features and additional insurance.

    Excepted (from this) are additional mileage, additional features and additional insurance.


    Can I omit "from this" in this sentence?

    Thank you!
    A little context would help. This sounds like a fee, a charge or a tax. If that is the case, I would use "exempted from this".

  3. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Exempt(ed) vs. except(ed)

    Thank you. In other words, the offer / discount does not apply to addtional mileage etc. Does "exempted from" still work in this case?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Exempt(ed) vs. except(ed)

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Thank you. In other words, the offer / discount does not apply to addtional mileage etc. Does "exempted from" still work in this case?
    Yes, it does. "Excepted" would also work well in that context.

  5. probus's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Exempt(ed) vs. except(ed)

    Exempt refers specifically to a law or rule, usually a taxing law. The verb or adjective except has a similar meaning but is more general: it has no attachment to law.

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