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  1. #1
    coolfool is offline Junior Member
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    Default walk the walk with sb.

    A sentence in Playboy Interview: Samuel L. Jackson, page 64, Playboy October 2013, reads:


    They walked the walk with Dr. King.


    Does it mean They, together with Dr. King, walked the walk. or They did what Dr. King expected.?


    Thanks a lot.

  2. #2
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    not a teacher

    I'm assuming you understand the phrase "walk the walk" and how it relates to "talk the talk". For example: "When it comes to civil rights, a lot of people just talk the talk but don't walk the walk."
    In your quote it means that they not only talked about civil rights and what should be done, they also went out and tried to do something about it, as Dr King did. In this case it could also refer to literally walking with him on the famous protest marches.
    So yes, "They, together with Dr King, walked the walk."

  3. #3
    coolfool is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    Grateful for your reply.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    Your appreciation is welcome, coolfool, but there is no need to write a new post to express your gratitude. Simply click the Like button on any posts you find helpful. It means that we don't have to open the thread again to read your new post and then find that it doesn't include any new information or an additional question.



  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    I'm not sure 'walked the walk' has that figurative meaning here. In the context, it seems to me that it might mean 'They participated with Dr King on the The Great March on Washington (sometimes, I think, called 'The Freedom Walk' or just 'The Walk'. I don't think I've ever met 'walk the walf' (in the figurative sense) in such close collocation with 'with'.

    b

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    Couldn't it carry both meanings- it was a literal walk, but it achieved a lot.

  7. #7
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    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Couldn't it carry both meanings- it was a literal walk, but it achieved a lot.
    Yes, and I think both meanings were intended. If the literal participation in the march was the only meaning intended, the sentence would have more likely been "They walked with Dr. King."

  8. #8
    coolfool is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I'm not sure 'walked the walk' has that figurative meaning here. In the context, it seems to me that it might mean 'They participated with Dr King on the The Great March on Washington (sometimes, I think, called 'The Freedom Walk' or just 'The Walk'. I don't think I've ever met 'walk the walf' (in the figurative sense) in such close collocation with 'with'.

    b
    1. Congressman John Lewis of Georgia on Clinton and Congress; Legislative Agenda, CBS Special, 1993 (19930120): … You were early on with President Clinton, early supporter of him, helped make it happen. But now he’s got to walk the talk. Is Congress ready to help him, or there have been some sounds that even Democrats in Congress aren’t quite ready to – to fall in behind him and he’s going to have trouble. What do you think? Rep-LEWIS: No. We’re ready. We are ready and willing to help. We just concluded a luncheon with President Clinton, and we’re ready to walk the walk with him and talk the talk with him.

    2. Chicago Woman with AIDS Fights for a Home for Her Child, NPR ATC, 1993(19931110): His best friend’s mom got sick when he was five or six and that’s really I think when death hit him. Because she was very, very close to me. It was hard for a little boy to see, but I felt he needed to walk the walk with me so he would be stronger and more prepared when the time came for his father and myself. ...
    Last edited by coolfool; 29-Sep-2013 at 15:06.

  9. #9
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: walk the walk with sb.

    I didn't follow the link before posting. In 1 the meaning is clearly metaphorical and idomatic. In 2 it seems to me that the mother is referring to the March on Washington. I don't really see how a child could 'walk the walk' with his mother in that idiomatic sense; she wanted his experience on the march to strengthen his character for when she died (as, in 1993, she might reasonably have expected [AIDS treatment has come a long way in 20 years {in the West, at least }, but that's not to the point - it's only relevant when it comes to understanding what the words meant for the woman at the time]).

    b

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