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  1. #1
    JACEK1 is offline Member
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    Default no excuse + ing form =? no excuse for noun to infinitive and meaning

    Hello all users!

    Yesterday I saw the sentence "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" on CNN.

    Can "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" be expressed as "there is no excuse for treating a man in this manner"?

    I have another question regarding this structure. Does "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" mean "it is unthinkable for man to be treated in this manner or "Nothing justifies treating a man in this manner"?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: no excuse + ing form =? no excuse for noun to infinitive and meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Can "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" be expressed as "there is no excuse for treating a man in this manner"?
    Yes, though both sentences should begin with a capital letter.
    Does "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" mean "it is unthinkable for man to be treated in this manner or "Nothing justifies treating a man in this manner"?
    It could theoretically mean the first, but it's far more likely to mean the second. Context will tell you.

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