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  1. #1
    JACEK1 is offline Member
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    Default no excuse + ing form =? no excuse for noun to infinitive and meaning

    Hello all users!

    Yesterday I saw the sentence "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" on CNN.

    Can "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" be expressed as "there is no excuse for treating a man in this manner"?

    I have another question regarding this structure. Does "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" mean "it is unthinkable for man to be treated in this manner or "Nothing justifies treating a man in this manner"?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: no excuse + ing form =? no excuse for noun to infinitive and meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Can "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" be expressed as "there is no excuse for treating a man in this manner"?
    Yes, though both sentences should begin with a capital letter.
    Does "there is no excuse for a man to be treated in this manner" mean "it is unthinkable for man to be treated in this manner or "Nothing justifies treating a man in this manner"?
    It could theoretically mean the first, but it's far more likely to mean the second. Context will tell you.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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