Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Classroom English

    I heard some Russian teachers say in class something like this: "Now your homework. Who wants to answer?" (when they want their students to present to the class some home prepared oral activities (monologues, for example) .

    I am interested in the verb "to answer". Can it be used without an object in a sentence like the one above? I know that "Who wants to be the first with their homework?" or other similar phrases could be a better alternative, but I just want to know if the verb to answer can be used in the situation described?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,858
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    I heard some Russian teachers say in class something like this: "Now your homework. Who wants to answer?" (when they want their students to present to the class some home prepared oral activities (monologues, for example) .

    I am interested in the verb "to answer". Can it be used without an object in a sentence like the one above? I know that "Who wants to be the first with their homework?" or other similar phrases could be a better alternative, but I just want to know if the verb to answer can be used in the situation described?
    The verb "answer" can be used without a direct object (intransitive). That sentence, however, is a bit strange.

  3. #3
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The verb "answer" can be used without a direct object (intransitive). That sentence, however, is a bit strange.
    The matter is that in my language it's very common to ask a student just "to answer" which means (in my language) to start speaking on some topic they have prepared at home. I know that it's a bit strange, and I am looking for some better verb. Is there a verb in English which could be used instead of "to answer" (the verb "to start" is OK, but is there some verb closer in meaning to the verb in question (with the meaning I have described above))?

    Our English teacher (he also was Russian) used to say Who wants to take the floor? But I wonder if there is a verb closer in meaning to our Russian "to answer".
    It's a bit strange that native speakers can do without such an important verb. Do English teachers always have to use a few words instead of just one (like our Russian "to answer") when they want their student just "to answer"?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 06-Oct-2013 at 20:39.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,318
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    "Now, your homework. Who wants to start?"
    This seems good to me.

  5. #5
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,858
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    The matter is that in my language it's very common to ask a student just "to answer" which means (in my language) to start speaking on some topic he / she have prepared at home. I know that it's a bit strange, and I am looking for some better verb. Is there a verb in English which could be used instead of "to answer" (the verb "to start" is OK, but is there some verb closer in meaning to the verb in question (with the meaning I have described above))?

    Our English teacher (he also was Russian) used to say Who wants to take the floor? But I wonder if there is a verb closer in meaning to our Russian "to answer".
    I can't think of one offhand. I would use "start" or "begin".

  6. #6
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Thanks for your replies. So, it's cultural... I'll have to accept it somehow.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  7. #7
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    And one more question related to this thread: if I want to know if all the students have "answered" their homework, can I ask: "Who hasn't answered yet?"
    or Who hasn't (done what) yet? (I need this phrase badly every day in class, so I want a good one, not just translated literally from my language.)
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  8. #8
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,858
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    And one more question related to this thread: if I want to know if all the students have "answered" their homework, can I ask: "Who hasn't answered yet?"
    or Who hasn't (done what) yet? (I need this phrase badly every day in class, so I want a good one, not just translated literally from my language.)
    You could use "spoken" or "presented".

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,749
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Now, your homework. Who wants to start?"
    This seems good to me.
    Or Who wants to go first?

  10. #10
    englishhobby's Avatar
    englishhobby is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    You could use "spoken" or "presented".
    So how should I put it in a sentence :
    Who hasn't spoken on their homework yet? or
    Who hasn't presented their homework yet?

    Are the phrases above good English?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. classroom English
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Sep-2009, 05:03
  2. classroom English
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-May-2009, 14:16
  3. classroom English
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-May-2009, 12:09
  4. Classroom English
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2009, 03:12
  5. Using English outside the classroom
    By nogah in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 19-Mar-2007, 14:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •