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  1. #11
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    We don't tend to "present" homework. If your homework was to write a presentation, then I would simply say "Who hasn't done their presentation yet?" The homework was to prepare the presentation. Once they're in the classroom, they are presenting the presentation.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Classroom English

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    I disagree. "Who would like to present (their homework) first?" sounds perfectly fine to me in this context. The homework in question was prepared for the purpose of reciting it to the class, which, I would say, makes it a 'presentation'. You could also say "Who would like to read off their homework first?" or simply "Who wants to go first?".

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickVic9000 View Post
    (Not a Teacher)

    I disagree. "Who would like to present (their homework) first?" sounds perfectly fine to me in this context. The homework in question was prepared for the purpose of reciting it to the class, which, I would say, makes it a 'presentation'. You could also say "Who would like to read off their homework first?" or simply "Who wants to go first?".
    That would be "read out" in BrE, not "read off".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We don't tend to "present" homework. If your homework was to write a presentation, then I would simply say "Who hasn't done their presentation yet?" The homework was to prepare the presentation. Once they're in the classroom, they are presenting the presentation.
    The main problem for me as a teacher is that I often give my students "oral homework" which means they have to prepare monologues (not only presentations) and I need some classroom English to invite them to present their monologues. For example, at the previous lesson I asked them to prepare a monologue (= a talk) on the topic Winter in Russia. Now I want to check their homework which means that I want my students to tell their version of the topic Winter in Russia. We do discuss things in class, when they have to speak on the spot, without preparation, but this is a different activity. So, they have prepared their monologues about winter in Russia at home and now I want them to talk about winter in Russia which was their homework. So I say: "Now, your homework. You were to prepare monologues on the topic Winter in Russia. Who wants to go first?" Some students "present their monologues", then I ask:

    OK, who hasn't presented/some other verb their monologues yet????

    or

    Who hasn't told/spoken
    on/some other verb their homework yet?

    (I want to see how many students are left who haven't spoken in the form of a monologue about winter in Russia. I need to word this meaning properly.)
    Last edited by englishhobby; 07-Oct-2013 at 19:52.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  5. #15
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    If you want to keep it simple, just say, "Who has not gone yet?"
    As long as your students understand what you want them to do, there's no need to elaborate.

    If you must be specific, then say, "Who has not {presented/recited/read} their {monologue/homework} yet?"

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That would be "read out" in BrE, not "read off".
    The point is that I always warn my students not to read what they have prepared, but to TELL it to the class without looking at their notes. I often tell them that I don't want to listen them READ their monologues, I want them to SPEAK on the topic. So will read out do in this situation?

    I am afraid that if I say "read out" they will understand that literally and start reading what they have written while I want them to "give a prepared talk"on the subject.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickVic9000 View Post
    If you want to keep it simple, just say, "Who has not gone yet?"
    As long as your students understand what you want them to do, there's no need to elaborate.

    If you must be specific, then say, "Who has not {presented/recited/read} their {monologue/homework} yet?"
    Thank you very much, SlickVic9000, I think that's exactly what I need!

    Thanks to everyone for this discussion, it really helped me understand native speakers' thinking better!
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  8. #18
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Classroom English

    If it's improvised, then no. "Who would like to {speak about/discuss/present} their topic first?" would be more appropriate.

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