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    #1

    Had/have Better Beware

    Hello there,

    Hope you are well.


    I was confronted with this sentence " A flay that lands on a Venus Flytrap had better beware."
    My question is: is this an idiom and what does it mean? and is it used with "had or have" interchangeably?


    I appreciate your efforts.
    Thank you very much.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Had/have Better Beware

    Quote Originally Posted by Nouf S View Post
    Hello there,

    Hope you are well. Unnecessary


    I was confronted with this sentence "A flay fly that lands on a Venus Flytrap had better beware."
    My question is: is this an idiom and what does it mean, and is it used with "had" or ​"have" interchangeably?


    I appreciate your efforts.
    Thank you very much.
    Unnecessary
    It's not an idiom. Do you understand what "beware" means?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #3

    Re: Had/have Better Beware

    Thank you for editing (though I think you will cross it :P )

    Yes I know what "beware" means, but I'm confused because the past tens was used "had better beware". The context suggests tht it is done and the fly will be aeten definatly. If I'm wrong then, is it used with "had" or ​"have" interchangeably?

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    #4

    Re: Had/have Better Beware

    Had better is used in present time with a meaning like a strong form of should.

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    #5

    Re: Had/have Better Beware

    Had better beware is an expression of warning. Had better is often reduced to better, especially in spoken English.
    Well, it's got nothing to do with tenses. Its form always takes had. To me, you could actually say it is some kind of idiomatic phrase.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Had/have Better Beware

    Quote Originally Posted by Nouf S View Post
    If I'm wrong then, is it used with "had" or ​"have" interchangeably?
    Nothing is used with 'had' or 'have' interchangeably.

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