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  1. #1
    Denisius is offline Newbie
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    Default What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    I couldn't get why the word 'proved' placed before the words 'the knees' in this phrase https://soundcloud.com/researcher76/prove, because it's meaningless for me in the context of the phrase: "And this joint here the top proved the nees to move over".
    So be so kind and tell me what nuance I didn't get.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    I think he says "this joint here at the top probably needs to move over ."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I think he says "this joint here at the top probably needs to move over ."
    That's what I caught. It's not very clear.

  4. #4
    Denisius is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    Barb_D and 5jj, thanks a lot for your help!
    Nevertheless I'm curious to know why the narrator swallowed the consonants 'b' and 'l', because however hard I tried to catch the word 'probably', I failed in that. As far as I know from English phonetics, any voiced consonants must be pronounced clear and mustn't be deafened. So there are probably some changes in English phonetics which I don't know about. If so, please let me know about them.
    Last edited by Denisius; 27-Oct-2013 at 06:40.

  5. #5
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by Denisius View Post
    As far as I know from English phonetics, any voiced consonants must be pronounced clear and mustn't be deafened..
    There's no 'must' about it. In everyday conversation, many speakers speak an incredible variety of ways.

  6. #6
    Denisius is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    5jj, and again I'm grateful to you for your answer. It's quite encouraging because if there is no 'must' and, as I hope, no 'should' then a part of mine that tends to anarchy is going to cry - halleluiah! And if someone reproach me for my totally incomprehensible English one day, I'll be glad to tell him something like "Esfads fdfj adfkj iopwer jldfj!", and it'll be his(her) own problem if he(she) doesn't get me.
    5jj, my sensei, for a moment you showed me that perfect world I'd like to live in. lots of thanks to you for that.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    The word "probably" is not clearly enunciated by many people. In fact, I have noticed over the last couple of years that some people have even started to write it as "prolly". Note that that is not a standard English word and should not be used by learners in any situation. I myself say "probly" quite frequently. This is what you would hear in an informal conversation:

    Are you going to Tom's party tonight?
    Probly not.

    In fact, you might hear "You going to Tom's party tonight?" or even "Going to Tom's party tonight?" too in that informal conversation.

    If you transcribed that conversation, you would write "Probably".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    I've seen both 'prolly' and 'probly'; and heard both /prɒli/ and /prɒbli/. Just think about all the effort needed to make that extra /bə/

    b

  9. #9
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    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    I can't say I've heard anyone try to say "probably" without the "r", though. I don't think it's a BrE thing, either. The guy probably just got a little tongue-tied.

  10. #10
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: What does the word 'proved' mean in this phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickVic9000 View Post
    I can't say I've heard anyone try to say "probably" without the "r", though. I don't think it's a BrE thing, either. The guy probably just got a little tongue-tied.
    I'm confused. I can't see any suggestion in any of the posts in this thread that anyone tries to pronounce "probably" without the "r".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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