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  1. #1
    kahhong is offline Member
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    Exclamation what does this mean?

    hi there,

    what does this sentence mean? "I go to washroom for a while"

    this sentence is present tense, does it mean this is repeated action or true in general?


    Thank You,

    Warmest Regards,


    -kahhong

  2. #2
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    Default Re: what does this mean?

    I think it means: you take a little time for washing your body.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: what does this mean?

    It means that you are going to the bathroom or toilet for a short time. Introcuing a time reference suggests that there may be a reason for it not normally associated with the act, such as being upset and wanting to be alone.

  4. #4
    kahhong is offline Member
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    Question Re: what does this mean?

    Thank raymon and tdol...
    that means, this sentence "i go to washroom for a while" doesnt refer to repeated action or true in general Only refer to that particular moment?

    how about this, should i use Do you ever see a ghost? or have you ever seen a ghost? what are the differrences between that two sentences.

    thank you.

    Warmest Regards,
    -kahhong
    Last edited by kahhong; 17-Mar-2006 at 15:24. Reason: Add-ons

  5. #5
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    Default Re: what does this mean?

    The problem with your original sentence is that it is taken out of context. It could very easily refer to a repeated action, for example:

    Every morning I get up at seven, do a few exercises, then I go to the washroom for a while. After that, I get dressed...

    Again, "Do you ever see a ghost?" would refer to a repeated action:

    "I often go to that old house on the hill, the one they say is haunted."
    "Really? Do you ever see a ghost?"

    The question "Have you ever seen a ghost?" is in the present perfect. The present perfect is used to link an action in the past with the present. In this case, it means: "Do you have experience of ghosts?"

    "Welcome to Weird Science, the chat show featuring mad scientists. This evening, we welcome Professor van Tomm, who has been conducting studies into ghosts, phantoms and spectres. So tell me, Professor, have you ever seen a ghost?"

  6. #6
    kahhong is offline Member
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    Talking Re: what does this mean?

    Thanks Rewboss,

    But how about in conversation;
    For an example:
    Mum : Go to sleep now, James.
    James: alright.


    Mum said go to sleep now to James, so it is reffering to
    Repeated Action? am i right?


    2nd Threat
    "so it ______ to Repeated Action?" should i use present continuous or present tense?
    A. is referring
    B. refers

    Thank You,


    Warmest Regards,
    -kahhong
    Last edited by kahhong; 18-Mar-2006 at 10:32. Reason: Typing Error 6016-853-8618

  7. #7
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    Default Re: what does this mean?

    "Go to sleep" is neither present simple nor present progressive: it's an imperative -- that is, a command. "Go" is not a finite verb at all, but the basic form. You can't normally see that it's the basic form in English, except when you use the verb "to be": "Be good", or "Be careful", for example. So here, the verb doesn't really have a tense at all.

    You can say either "it refers" or "it is referring". I think the simple present would be more usual here, because that sentence refers to the same thing every time you write it or read it in that context -> repeated action. But the present progressive is also OK.

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