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  1. #1
    toutoublue is offline Newbie
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    Default Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Hello,

    I read an article talking about Tweeter's IPO. In this article, the writer compared the IPO of Tweeter with that of Facebook. A phrase got me confused.

    " Facebook's underwriters gave a bigger cut to retail investors than is typically the case with IPOs."
    I understand what it means. However, What does "than" function here ? A preposition or a conjunction ? Why there is no subject before "is typically" ?

    I'd really appreciate it if someone could help me out.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    ...than (that which) is typically...

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    "They gave a bigger cut than the cut which is typically given in IPOs." The subject of "is typical" is 'cut'.

  4. #4
    toutoublue is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Thank you for your answers. =)
    I want to get a deeper dive into this question.
    In the same article, there is another phrase
    "It's a far better market for IPOs than when Facebook came out
    What is the complete phrase like ? "It's a far better market for IPOs than (that which was) when Fackbook came out." ?
    A part from "that", are there any other words we can apply after "than" ? For instance, "when", "where", "what", "how" ?
    Thanks a lot.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Quote Originally Posted by toutoublue View Post
    What is the complete phrase like ? "It's a far better market for IPOs than (the market which existed) when Fackbook came out." ? Or delete the blue - "... than when Facebook..."
    A part from "that", are there any other words we can apply after "than" ? For instance, "when", "where", "what", "how" ?
    Thanks a lot.
    "It's now a far better X than the X was when ...." = "It's a far better X than existed when ..."
    "A better X than ..." can usually be completed with some phrase involving another X.
    "Yours is a better X than mine." = "Your X is better than my X".
    It's comparative. Your'e comparing Xs. Yes, you can use an appropriate pronoun for the second.

    Yes you can sometimes use other constructions. "It's a better life now than when I was a child." = "... than life was when..."
    You can try to make some sentences with your other words and we'll check them.

  6. #6
    toutoublue is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Thank you so much, Raymott.
    Here are some sentences I made divided into several groups. I'd appreciate it if you could check them.

    It is a better company than where I worked.

    He is much taller than he was.
    He is much taller than he was when he was 16 years old.
    He is much taller than when he was 16 years old.

    He has a better car than Mary.
    He has a better car than Mary has.
    He has a better car than the car Mary has.
    His car is better than the car Mary has.


    As I notice, we can leave out the subjects precede the clause, for example : It's a better life now than (life was) when I was a child. Why can we do that ?

    Thanks a lot.

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Quote Originally Posted by toutoublue View Post
    Thank you so much, Raymott.
    Here are some sentences I made divided into several groups. I'd appreciate it if you could check them.

    It is a better company than where I worked.

    He is much taller than he was.
    He is much taller than he was when he was 16 years old.
    He is much taller than when he was 16 years old.

    He has a better car than Mary.
    He has a better car than Mary has.
    He has a better car than the car Mary has.
    His car is better than the car Mary has.


    As I notice, we can leave out the subjects precede the clause, for example : It's a better life now than (life was) when I was a child. Why can we do that ?

    Thanks a lot.
    Yes they are all possible.
    You can leave out the subject because there's no reason to repeat it if it's understood. "Life: it's better now than when I was young." The comparison you're making is between 'now' and 'when I was young'.

  8. #8
    toutoublue is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Where is the subject of this phrase ?

    Thank you very much ! It's really kind of you !

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