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  1. #1
    thema is offline Banned
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    Default Sucession Line Run

    Using this dictionary ( learnersdictionary.com/definition/run ), I cannot seem to find a good definition of "run" that would fit some passage:

    ( abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/house-windsor-welcomes-royal-19741481 )
    "Also tonight, that boy, of course is changing the royal line of succession, leaping in front of uncle harry. Now that william has a new baby, how does the line of succession run? "

    Could this be a journalistic jargon?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Quote Originally Posted by thema View Post
    Using this dictionary ( learnersdictionary.com/definition/run ), I cannot seem to find a good definition of "run" that would fit some passage:

    ( abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/house-windsor-welcomes-royal-19741481 )
    "Also tonight, that boy, of course is changing the royal line of succession, leaping in front of uncle harry. Now that william has a new baby, how does the line of succession run? "

    Could this be a journalistic jargon?
    No, it is not jargon.

    There is a line of succession to the throne. The list runs from first in line to whoever is last.

  3. #3
    thema is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    No, it is not jargon.

    There is a line of succession to the throne. The list runs from first in line to whoever is last.
    Could you point me to an appropriate definition on the web? Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Quote Originally Posted by thema View Post
    Could you point me to an appropriate definition on the web? Thanks!
    I would say that #14 and/or #23 in the first section is applicable: run - definition of run by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

  5. #5
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    not a teacher

    "Run" has many subtly different meanings. In this case it means to take a particular order over a period of time.
    In the dictionary link I feel that definition #23 (intransitive) is probably closest.
    run - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education

    So the sentence is: "Now that William has a new baby, what is the order of the line of succession?"

    ps: Mike just beat me to it, I'll leave my post up to show that I agree with him.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    not a teacher

    "Run" has many subtly different meanings. In this case it means to take a particular order over a period of time.
    In the dictionary link I feel that definition #23 (intransitive) is probably closest.
    run - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education

    So the sentence is: "Now that William has a new baby, what is the order of the line of succession?"

    ps: Mike just beat me to it, I'll leave my post up to show that I agree with him.
    It is interesting that we both came up with the same dictionary.

    Just curious. What do you think about #14?

  7. #7
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Just curious. What do you think about #14?

    I was drawn to both 14 and 19, as well.
    I think the crucial sense of a changeable order is missing in 14, and in 19 the implication of an end-point makes it not quite right.
    To me, 23 seems best although still not quite satisfactory.

  8. #8
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    Just curious. What do you think about #14?

    I was drawn to both 14 and 19, as well.
    I think the crucial sense of a changeable order is missing in 14, and in 19 the implication of an end-point makes it not quite right.
    To me, 23 seems best although still not quite satisfactory.
    I like 14 because it talks about extending to a certain point. We often "go down a list" to a certain point.

  9. #9
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Sucession Line Run

    Looking at my earlier post it occurred to me that the current line of succession probably is officially finite, which seems to be the case.
    It appears that the orb stops with Karin Vogel of Germany (#5754 in line, b.1973).
    http://www.royalcentral.co.uk/blogs/...7#.UoBmoxwdqya
    I always thought my chances of assuming the throne were slim at best, but it's disappointing to find that I wouldn't even be in consideration.

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