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Thread: Noun

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    #1

    Noun

    Is the feminine word for tailor?

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    #2

    Re: Noun

    Welcome to the forum, UmaAshokan.

    We don't use feminine versions these days. Both men and women are tailors.

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    #3

    Re: Noun

    Is there a concept of feminine and masculine word in English? I guess it's only in French language (or perhaps) in some other languages.

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    #4

    Re: Noun

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Nabih:

    Here in the United States, people now use gender-neutral nouns. (It is considered discourteous to use gender-specific nouns.)

    Here are a few examples:

    waiter / waitress. NOW: server.
    actor / actress. NOW: actor.
    mailman. NOW: letter carrier.
    steward / stewardess. NOW: flight attendant.
    fireman. NOW: firefighter.
    poet / poetess. NOW: poet.
    host / hostess. NOW: host.

    NOTES:

    1. Many (most?) women -- in my opinion -- would NOT feel insulted if you referred to them as a "waitress," "actress," or "hostess," but I am 99% sure that they WOULD be very upset (unhappy) if you referred to them as a "stewardess" or "poetess."

    2. Many nouns in English are already gender-neutral. E.g., [for example] president, teacher, plumber, clerk [sales associate], soldier, etc.





    James

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