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Thread: idiom

  1. #1
    dalilasfr is offline Newbie
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    Default idiom

    Hello,
    please would you like to tell me what this underlined idiom means:
    " ...even the nurse accused her of putting her finger down her thought to get sick."
    thanks!

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: idiom

    Welcome to the forum. dalilasfr.


    There is no idiom here, but there is a mistake - thought should be throat.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: idiom

    I would say to make herself sick rather than to get sick.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by dalilasfr View Post
    Hello.

    Please would you like to tell me what this underlined idiom means:

    "... even the nurse accused her of putting her finger down her thought to get sick."

    Thanks!
    Remember to start every new sentence with a capital letter.
    The spacing around an ellipsis works like this - When it appears between two words, you leave a space at either end of the ellipsis. When it begins a quote, the first dot goes straight after the opening quotation marks and then you leave a space after the third dot.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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