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    #1

    For one thing - usage

    I know what "for one thing" means. But sometimes idioms are used in such a way that gives non native speakers a hard time to understand its meaning. I am going to talk about the above mentioned idiom's usage in a sentence that I found today. Though I think I am right about understanding its meaning, yet I want to make sure that I am not making any error in getting its meaning. Here is the sentence -
    She had never cared for the kind of tea on offer in her hometown, but in the two weeks she had spent in Assam she had developed an unexpected affinity for the tea on offer here. There were no spices in it for one thing, and this was more to her taste than the tea at home.
    I guess the last sentence means "Her hometown's tea had no spices whereas the tea available in Assam has spices. And that is the one reason she likes Assam tea over her hometown's tea. Am I right? Please correct me if I'm wrong. Thanking you in advance.

    Not only that if the sentence gives the reason why she likes Assam tea, I believe "for that reason" should associate with "this was more to her taste than the tea at home" clause. Isn't it?
    Please help.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: For one thing - usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Man_From_India View Post
    I know what "for one thing" means. But sometimes idioms are used in such a way that gives non native speakers a hard time to understand its meaning. I am going to talk about the above mentioned idiom's usage in a sentence that I found today. Though I think I am right about understanding its meaning, yet I want to make sure that I am not making any error in getting its meaning. Here is the sentence -I guess the last sentence means "Her hometown's tea had no spices whereas the tea available in Assam has spices. And that is the one reason she likes Assam tea over her hometown's tea. Am I right? Please correct me if I'm wrong. Thanking you in advance.

    Not only that if the sentence gives the reason why she likes Assam tea, I believe "for that reason" should associate with "this was more to her taste than the tea at home" clause. Isn't it?
    Please help.
    No, it means the opposite of that. One of the reasons that she preferred Assam tea over tea from her home town was that Assam tea was made without spices.

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