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Thread: cut short

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    #1

    cut short

    1) In a sentence like this: My talk started well, but I dried up after a few minutes, the meaning of "dry up" is "not to be able to carry on speaking maybe because you have forgotten the words" or more "to make up my mind to interrupt the speech just because I do not want to go on speaking"? Does simply "dry up" suggest anything particular to a native speaker?

    2) My second question is about the expression "cut short", relating to the sentence above. If I say: My talk started well, but I cut it short after a few minutes. Does it mean that I interrupt during my talk? WOuld it be a synonym of "stop" or "interrupt"? or do you think there are differences?
    And always relating to this expression, "to cut someone short"...is it just to interrupt someone speaking, to stop him? or anything else?
    Why shoud a native speaker use "to cut someone short" instead of "to stop/to interrupt someone"?

    I hope you can help me with this because I am not a native speaker and I really would like to learn to use this expression properly. Thank you all.

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    #2

    Re: cut short

    Quote Originally Posted by caesar1983 View Post
    1) In a sentence like this: My talk started well, but I dried up after a few minutes, the meaning of "dry up" is "not to be able to carry on speaking maybe because you have forgotten the words" or more "to make up my mind to interrupt the speech just because I do not want to go on speaking"? Does simply "dry up" suggest anything particular to a native speaker? It's more like I ran out of things to say. It's not that one has forgotten anything or that one wants to stop speaking.

    2) My second question is about the expression "cut short", relating to the sentence above. If I say: My talk started well, but I cut it short after a few minutes. Does it mean that I interrupt during my talk? WOuld it be a synonym of "stop" or "interrupt"? or do you think there are differences? If you "cut it short" the meaning is that you stopped before you planned to stop. For example, "I cut my trip short to fly home".
    And always relating to this expression, "to cut someone short"...is it just to interrupt someone speaking, to stop him? or anything else?
    Why shoud a native speaker use "to cut someone short" instead of "to stop/to interrupt someone"? If I cut you short, I stop you from proceeding. "The producers decided to cut the show short because of the storm". Using this, or any other, expression is a matter of taste. Why would one call the large object in the sky the moon instead of the nearby satellite?


    I hope you can help me with this because I am not a native speaker and I really would like to learn to use this expression properly. Thank you all.
    Gil

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