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Thread: "with" vs "to"

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  1. #1
    070281achilles is offline Newbie
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    "with" vs "to"

    When do I use with or to when combined with another. word? For example, the phrase "confused with" ad "confused to", how would I know what to use? Does the use of "with" and "to" apply to all kinds of words?
    What are the meanings and differences of the following sentences?
    "I get confused with complex sentences."
    "I get confused to complex sentences."
    Thanks.
    Last edited by 070281achilles; 06-Dec-2013 at 16:08.

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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: "with" vs "to"

    Thanks for following my advice.

    "Confused with" is correct.

    You may also hear "confused by," "confused about" or even "confused over."

    Do not use "confused to."

    You can also say "Complex sentences are confusing."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    070281achilles is offline Newbie
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    Re: "with" vs "to"

    No, "I should be the one thanking you" for giving that advice or any kind of advice because it always show your concern for whoever who wants to learn English here. I really admire people like you.
    Is "confused to" wrong"? For what reason? What's the difference with "confuse with"?

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    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: "with" vs "to"

    Because certain prepositions mean certain things and don't mean other things.

    By the way, "confused by" is a better choice than "confused with" as I thought about it more. I was thinking only about your with/to choices.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    PeterValk is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "with" vs "to"

    I'm not a teacher nor a native English speaker...

    It all depends on what you want to say:
    She was confused by his behaviour (meaning: his behaviour didn't seem logical to her)
    Don't confuse verbs with adverbs (meaning: understand the difference, don't mix them up)
    Peter
    (I'm not a teacher or a native English speaker. I'm just trying to help...)

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: "with" vs "to"

    Quote Originally Posted by 070281achilles View Post
    Is "confused to" wrong"? For what reason?
    Prepositions are often a matter of collocation- the logic behind the choice is that everyone else says the same, so it's often just accepting the usage rather than looking for explanations.

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