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    #1

    A book for idioms

    I(being a non native speaker) often find myself coming up with unnecessarily contrived(and often awkward) sentences when a simple idiom would have made it sound natural(and much more pleasing).

    For example, if I am showering praise on someone without their knowing that I am making fun of them, it will never come to my mind that I am ""pulling his leg" and he isn't getting it" rather than ""making fun of him with all these undeserving praise" and he isn't getting it" .

    Could you please suggest a book that provides idioms to be used for these kinds of common situations?
    Last edited by justlearning; 25-Dec-2013 at 15:37.

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    #2

    Re: A book for idioms

    You'll find many here: English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions - UsingEnglish.com
    If you want a dictionary of idioms, Cambridge University Press does a good one: Dictionaries - Catalogue | Cambridge University Press | ELT

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    #3

    Re: A book for idioms

    Quote Originally Posted by justlearning View Post
    I (being a non native speaker) often find myself coming up with unnecessarily contrived (and often awkward) sentences when a simple idiom would have made it sound natural (and much more pleasing).
    Remember to put a space before an opening bracket. See my corrections above in red.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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