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  1. #1
    cheers100 is offline Newbie
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    tend vs. tend to

    Hello!

    An online Dictionary instructs "tend" is a transitive verb, with an illustration as below, when it means look after.


    v.tr.1. To have the care of; watch over; look after: tend a child.
    Here's URL
    tend - definition of tend by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.


    But I found "tend to some" from Washington Post. Here's the snippet with the URL link.

    You can let your closest work friends know you’re tending to a family matter, while assuring (and ensuring) that their needs will still be met on time. And try not to take advantage of their sympathy.
    @Work Advice: - The Washington Post


    How should I use "tend someone" and "tend to someone" when it comes to "look after"?


    Many thanks!

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: tend vs. tend to

    Quote Originally Posted by cheers100 View Post
    Hello!

    An online Dictionary instructs "tend" is a transitive verb, with an illustration as below, when it means look after.

    v.tr.1. To have the care of; watch over; look after: tend a child.


    Here's URL
    tend - definition of tend by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.


    But I found "tend to some" from Washington Post. Here's the snippet with the URL link.

    You can let your closest work friends know you’re tending to a family matter, while assuring (and ensuring) that their needs will still be met on time. And try not to take advantage of their sympathy.



    @Work Advice: - The Washington Post


    How should I use "tend someone" and "tend to someone" when it comes to "look after"?


    Many thanks!
    Had it been written by a Washington Post journalist, it should have been "attending to a family matter". However, the letter was submitted to the newspaper by a member of the public so it was she who made the error. Newspapers generally don't correct spelling/grammar errors in readers' letters.

    Edit: Apologies - I just realised that the offending sentence was written by the journalist/writer for the Washington Post magazine so, in my opinion, it's an error.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Re: tend vs. tend to

    I don't think the use of "tending" here was a mistake. The same dictionary that the OP cited (American Heritage) defines one use of "intransitive tend" as "To apply one's attention; attend". They seem to be synonyms in that use.

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