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  1. #1
    justlearning is offline Newbie
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    Default but I didn't know you'll be in it

    There will be a play as a part of our school day celebrations. Suppose I came to know someone is playing a part in it, is any of the following correct in conveying that I knew of the drama but didn't know about his playing a part? The play is to be conducted on a future date.

    1. I knew about the play but didn't know you are in it.
    2. I knew about the play but didn't know you were in it.
    3. I knew about the play but didn't know you will be in it.
    4. I knew about the play but didn't know you would be in it.

    If I say #2, does it mean the play has already been conducted?
    Are #1 and #3., grammatically correct?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: but I didn't know you'll be in it

    Quote Originally Posted by justlearning View Post
    There will be a play as a part of our school day celebrations. Suppose I came to know someone is playing a part in it, is any of the following correct in conveying that I knew of the drama but didn't know about his playing a part? The play is to be conducted on a future date.

    1. I knew about the play but didn't know you are in it.
    2. I knew about the play but didn't know you were in it.
    3. I knew about the play but didn't know you will be in it.
    4. I knew about the play but didn't know you would be in it.

    If I say #2, does it mean the play has already been conducted?
    Are #1 and #3., grammatically correct?
    Both 2 and 4 are correct. In both cases, it is impossible to tell whether the play has already taken place or is due to take place in the future. 1 and 3 are not grammatically correct.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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