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Thread: IN vs ON

  1. #1
    lilah is offline Newbie
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    Default IN vs ON

    these are two words i always get confused when using in a sentence. it gets frustrating.

    Why is it "in" a video but "on" a tv and "on" a cd.
    "in" a newspaper or "in" a book but then "on" facebook, etc
    "in" a group but "on" a team.
    "in" a car but "on" a bus.
    can anybody shed light on this matter, yet another example "on" a matter but "in" a situation.

    a little extra question on the side, i've heard somebody say this "in" an interview put an image "to" a word. why not "on"? the interview was about learning a new language according to a polyglot.

    many thanks!

  2. #2
    Ali Hsn's Avatar
    Ali Hsn is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: IN vs ON

    Quote Originally Posted by lilah View Post
    these are two words i always get confused when using in a sentence. it gets frustrating.

    Why is it "in" a video but "on" a tv and "on" a cd.
    "in" a newspaper or "in" a book but then "on" facebook, etc
    "in" a group but "on" a team.
    "in" a car but "on" a bus.
    can anybody shed light on this matter, yet another example "on" a matter but "in" a situation.

    a little extra question on the side, i've heard somebody say this "in" an interview put an image "to" a word. why not "on"? the interview was about learning a new language according to a polyglot.

    many thanks!
    I'm not a native nor a teacher. But since there isn't any reply to this post, I decided to share what I know with you.

    There are some electronic components inside a TV but we watch the news ON the TV.
    I say IN the video probably because I can distinguish the frames, timeline, scenes, and parts of it. IN the movie, IN the video, etc. But when we talk about TV or radio the content isn't really INSIDE and distinguishable but they are some media to broadcast them.

    For websites also that's the same. We share a photo on Facebook, on twitter, on Google Plus. Unlike a book or newspaper, the data on websites aren't directly-physically, but rather virtually stored (and accessible.)

    I myself sometimes make some mistakes on using some propositions but the easiest way is to read and hear them more to get used to them and become fluent. : ))

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: IN vs ON

    Quote Originally Posted by lilah View Post
    these are two words i always get confused when using in a sentence. it gets frustrating.

    Why is it "in" a video but "on" a tv and "on" a cd.
    "in" a newspaper or "in" a book but then "on" facebook, etc
    "in" a group but "on" a team.
    "in" a car but "on" a bus.
    can anybody shed light on this matter, yet another example "on" a matter but "in" a situation.

    a little extra question on the side, i've heard somebody say this "in" an interview put an image "to" a word. why not "on"? the interview was about learning a new language according to a polyglot.

    many thanks!
    You might get more replies if you click "Edit Post" and put correct capitalisation through your post. Follow these rules:

    - Start every sentence with a capital letter.
    - Always capitalise the word "I" and all proper nouns (ie "CD").
    - End every sentence with a single appropriate punctuation mark.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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