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  1. #1
    The apprentice is offline Member
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    Default Intervocalic alveolar flapping

    Dear teachers and members:


    In american English (AmE), when an alveolar /t/ or /d/ is intervocalic and the second vowel is unstressed, a flap or tap /t/ or /d/ occurs. I would like to know what happen in the following cases:

    Bad attitude / bæd ˈætɪˌtud / :/ rætɪˌtud /; / ˈrætɪˌtud /

    In this phrase when the linking sound between BAD and ATTITUDE is made, a flap /d/ ocurred, so what happen with the stress in the word ATTITUDE; does it desappear or change?

    The same happens with these twos phrases:

    1) Bad apple / bæd ˈæpəl /

    2) Good option / ɡʊd ˈɒpʃən /


    Thanks and regards.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 04-Feb-2014 at 18:41.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Intervocalic alveolar flapping

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    In this phrase when the linking sound between BAD and ATTITUDE is made, a flap /d/ ocurreds, so what happens with the stress in the word ATTITUDE; does it deisappear or change?

    The same happens with these twos phrases:

    1) Bad apple / bæd ˈæpəl /

    2) Good option / ɡʊd ˈɒpʃən /
    The primary stress in a phrase depends on the context, not the sounds. You might wish to speak of a bad attitude, bad apple, good option or a bad attitude, bad apple or good option.

  3. #3
    The apprentice is offline Member
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    Default Re: Intervocalic alveolar flapping

    Thanks 5jj for the correction and explication; you and this site are always willing to help and cooperate.


    In isolated words the flapping occurs when the alveolar stop consonants /d/ or /t/ is intervocalic and the second vowel is unstressed, as in :

    Matter; /ˈmærər/ City; /ˈsɪrɪ/ Ladder; /ˈlærər/ MUddy; /ˈmʌrɪ/

    So, in the cases when two sounds are linked into one sound, it does not matter whether the stress is before or after the alveolar stop /d/ or /t/ to make the flapping sound.


    Regards
    Last edited by The apprentice; 05-Feb-2014 at 05:00.

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