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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    More on English intonation

    First, I'd like to express mythanks to all the teachers who explained my question, which threw a light on my puzzle.

    I guess I didn't make my point clear enough yesterday and I'd like to go into details as to this issue.
    I read a book written by Clifford H.Prator. In this book under Lexical ( Emotional) Intonation he wrote:

    There are many intonation patterns, other than those so far described in this manual, that are at times used by native speakers of Englsih. Most of them would be classified, however, as having lexical rather than grammatical meanings. That is to say, they add to the basic meaning of a sentence emotional overtones such as surprise, disbelief, shock, fear, respect,determination, carcasm, irony,friendliness, suspicion, and many more.

    For example, That's terrible (extra-high note )! suggests shock.

    According to this book it seems 'It's interesting' (falling intonation) should be put into the lexical group. That's where I felt confused because when 'interesting' is used this way it can bear three meanings (as teacher Casiopea explained: 1. sarcasm, 2. disagreement, 3. I really don't care to think about it). So I posted the question to ask whether it is lexical meaning or semantic meaning.

    I have also noticed that other adjectivs such as lovely, funny, generous, nice can also be used this way. That is the sentence stress is on these words and falling intonation is used. These words also bear the three meanings. Am I right?

    I am also wondering what intonation should be used if the speaker who says 'It is interesting/funny/lovely' holds a positive attitude. That is, he appreciates what he is talking about.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    I am no expert on such things. (Far from it.) But can something have both lexical and semantical meaning? Does it have to be either/or?

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    I know little about intonation. That's why I felt confused and asked whether the same intonation can be both lexical or semantic.

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I am no expert on such things. (Far from it.) But can something have both lexical and semantical meaning? Does it have to be either/or?
    :?

  4. #4
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    I await more input from the real experts on this one, Cas and Tdol.

    :D

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