Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    The apprentice is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    163
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Dear teachers and members:


    This is the last part of a previou one

    In american English (AmE), in some multisyllable words the /h/ phoneme is silent or elided when it is isolated or in a conversation, but I am not quite sure if this also happens in british English (BrE) too. The following is my exposition about it.

    1) IN ISOLATED WORDS:

    Vehicule /ˈviɪkəl/; 2) Durham /ˈdɜrəm/; 3) Pelham Bay /ˈpɛləm beɪ/; 4) Fordham Road; /ˈfɔrəm roʊd/

    2) IN COVERSATION:

    a) I worked hard /aɪ wɜrkthɑrd/; tends to elide the /h/, sounding as: /aɪ ˈwɜrktɑrd/

    b) He boke his arm / hiˈbroʊkhɪzɑrm / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / hiˈbroʊkɪzɑrm /

    3) I also found that the object pronouns HIM HER , YOU, US and THEM are reduced to Schwa in coversation when they are not at the end of a sentence, eliding the /h/ phoneme in most of the times, for examples:

    d) Tell him to come / ˈtɛlhəmtəˌkʌm / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / ˈtɛləmtəˌkʌm /

    e) I told you to give her the book / aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvhərəˈbʊk / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvərəˈbʊk /

    4) When HAVE is preceded by the modal verbs WOULD, COULD, SHOULD, MUST and MIGHT, HAVE it is reduced to Schwa eliding the /h/ phoneme and the /d/ phoneme of the preceding modal verb becomes flap or tap /d/. As mentioned above, this happens if HAVE is not at the end of a sentence, for examples:

    a) Anything would have been better / ˈɛnɪˌθɪŋˈwʊrəvbɪnˌbɛtər/

    b) He could have done much more / hiˈkʊrəvˌdʌnmʌtʃˈmɔr/

    c) It should have been you /ɪtˈʃʊrəvbɪnˈju/

    d) it must have been love / ɪtˈmʌsəvbɪnˌlʌv / sometimes / ɪtˈmʌstəvbɪnˌlʌv /

    e) I might have been an architec / aɪˈmaɪrəvbɪnənˈɑrkɪˌtɛkt/


    QUESTIONS :

    1) I have noticed that the word that precedes him, her, them, us. you and have it is always stressed, does this have to do anything with it?

    f) I know her brother / aɪˌnəʊhərˈbrʌər / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / aɪˌnəʊərˈbrʌər /

    2) Does this occur when the word that precedes him, her, his or have ends with a vowel sound?, as in:

    g) I know her brother / aɪ ˌnəʊ hər ˈbrʌər /

    3) Do the modal verbs change into Schwa in the aforementioned sentences?, as would does in the phonetic transcription:

    Anything would have been better / ˈɛnɪˌθɪŋ wəd həv bɪn ˈbɛtər/

    4) Do I put the primary and secondary stress properly in the phonetic transcriptions I made?

    5) Must the phonetic transcription of the sentence '' I told you to give her the book '' be put into two thought groups?, as follows:

    / aɪˈtəʊldʒju/ / təˌɡɪvərəˈbʊk /

    6) I think when the /v phoneme in have is before a consonant it is not supposed to be transcribed it, it seems to me that it loses its sound, doesn't it?

    7) Does the possesive adjective HIS, HER YOUR and THEIR takes the Schwa sound in conversation as well as elides the /h/ phoneme?

    i) Is this his house? / ɪzˈɪshəzˌhaʊs? / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / ɪzˈɪsəzˌhaʊs? /


    OBSEVATIONS :


    Pronunciation note in the word VEHICLE.

    Because the primary stress in vehicle is on the first syllable, the /h/ on the second syllable tends to desapear /ˈviːɪkəl/. A pronunciation with the primary stress on the second syllable and a fully pronounced /h/ is usually considered nonstandard / vɪˈhɪkjʊlər/. In the adjective vehicular, where the primary stress is normal on the second syllable, the /h/ is always pronounced.


    I will deeply appreciate your opinion and assistance in this matter

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    In aAmerican English (AmE), in some multisyllable words the /h/ phoneme is silent or elided when it is isolated or in a conversation, but I am not quite sure if this also happens in bBritish English (BrE) too. The following is my exposition about it.

    1) IN ISOLATED WORDS:

    Vehicule /ˈviɪkəl/; 2) Durham /ˈdɜrəm/; 3) Pelham Bay /ˈpɛləm beɪ/; 4) Fordham Road; /ˈfɔrəm roʊd/
    BrE: /ˈʌrəm/, /fɔ:dəm/

    2) IN COVERSATION:

    a) I worked hard /aɪ wɜrkthɑrd/; tends to elide the /h/, sounding as: /aɪ ˈwɜrktɑrd/

    b) He broke his arm / hiˈbroʊkhɪzɑrm / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / hiˈbroʊkɪzɑrm /
    BrE:
    a) /aɪ wɜ:kt :d/, /aɪ wɜ:ktɑ:d/
    b) / hi:ˈbrəʊk hɪzɑ:m /, /hi:ˈbrəʊkɪzɑ:m/

    I'll have a look at some more later, if I have time.[/QUOTE]

  3. #3
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    3) I also found that the object pronouns HIM HER , YOU, US and THEM are reduced to Schwa in coversation when they are not at the end of a sentence, eliding the /h/ phoneme in most of the times, for example:

    d) Tell him to come / ˈtɛlhəmtəˌkʌm / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / ˈtɛləmtəˌkʌm /
    e) I told you to give her the book / aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvhərəˈbʊk / tends to elide the /h/ sounding as: / aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvərəˈbʊk /
    BrE:

    d) /tɛ(or/e/)lhɪmtəˌkʌm/, /tɛ(or/e/)lɪmtəˌkʌm/
    e) /aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvhəəˈbʊk/,/ aɪˈtəʊldʒjətəˌɡɪvəəˈbʊk/
    Last edited by 5jj; 14-Feb-2014 at 13:26.

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    a) Anything would have been better / ˈɛnɪˌθɪŋˈwʊrəvbɪnˌbɛtər/
    b) He could have done much more / hiˈkʊrəvˌdʌnmʌtʃˈmɔr/
    c) It should have been you /ɪtˈʃʊrəvbɪnˈju/
    d) it must have been love / ɪtˈmʌsəvbɪnˌlʌv / sometimes / ɪtˈmʌstəvbɪnˌlʌv /
    e) I might have been an architec / aɪˈmaɪrəvbɪnənˈɑrkɪˌtɛkt/
    BrE:

    a) /ɛnɪˌθɪŋˈwʊdə(v)bɪ:nˌbɛtə(r)/. In some northern dialects, the /d/ may become [ɹ]. Some speakers of Cockney may produce [ɾ].
    The /v/ is often dropped in informal speech.
    An increasing number of younger speakers of many dialects produce a glottalstop, [ʔ], in place of intervocalic /t/, as in 'better'.

    b) /hi: ˈkʊdə(v)ˌdʌn mʌtʃˈ mɔ:(r)/. In some northern dialects, the /d/ may become [ɹ]. Some speakers of Cockney may produce [ɾ].
    The /v/ is often dropped in informal speech.

    c) /ɪt ˈʃʊdə(v)bɪnˈju/. In some northern dialects, the /d/ may become [ɹ]. Some speakers of Cockney may produce [ɾ].
    The /v/ is often dropped in informal speech.

    d) /ɪt mʌst ə(v)bɪnˌlʌv/. The /t/ of 'must is usually sounded. The /v/ is often dropped in informal speech.

    e) /aɪˈmaɪtə(v)bɪn ənɑ:kɪtɛkt/. the final consonant of 'might' may be produced as a glottal stop.
    The /v/ is often dropped in informal speech.

  5. #5
    The apprentice is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Dominican Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Dominican Republic
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    163
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Thank you 5jj:


    Your explanation is magnificient and excellent.

  6. #6
    charliedeut's Avatar
    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,421
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    I can't help but note that you looked for a sentence without /h/ elision!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation (last part)

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    1) I have noticed that the word that precedes him, her, them, us. you and have it is always stressed, does this have to do anything with it?
    The word that precedes him, her, them, etc may be stressed: I like her brother.

    2) Does this occur when the word that precedes him, her, his or have ends with a vowel sound?
    It freqently occurs when the preceding word ends in a consonant. In fact, the /h/ is more likely to be sounded after a vowel.

Similar Threads

  1. The different phoneme sounds of the vowel '' o ''. (Part I)
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-Dec-2013, 21:44
  2. The different phoneme sounds of the vowel '' o ''. (Part II)
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Dec-2013, 21:16
  3. Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation.
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 16-Dec-2013, 04:57
  4. elision
    By peter123 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2008, 18:14
  5. Help! Ellipsis or elision?!
    By Sarah_2005 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Jun-2005, 03:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •