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  1. #31
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    "It struck me as an excellent plan" certainly seems to better sentence to me. The other two words seem to be superfluous.

    :)

    [Edited for spelling. Thanks, Tdol.]

  2. #32
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Have a 't' on me.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwschang
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Is 'brand' an adverb as it modifies 'new'?
    Interesting Q.
    Looks like it is: like, brand new = very new = like new. If not hypenated:
    1. brand new = adverb + adjective (although brand is a noun)
    2. very new = adverb + adjective
    3. like new = adverb + adjective (although like is a preposition too)
    4. slow-burn (cooker) = adjective + infinitive
    5. high-octane (fuel) = adjective + noun

    Language is too complicated to be sacred! Trouble is, a lot of things are sacred only because they are complicated. Don't understand, don't ask, it's sacred.
    new brand (adj + noun)
    brand new (noun + adjective)
    really brand new (adv + adj + adj)

    I think 'brand' is a noun functioning as an adjective. Whaddya thunk?

    It's a new brand.

    :D

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    "It struck me as it is an excellent plan"
    Quote Originally Posted by James
    Perhaps it should be, "It struck me as an excellent plan." I don't think you need the "it is" part. The "It" is a problem in this sentence as the "as an excellent plan" part is clearly a complement of "it" rather than of the object, "me". It is different from the "He makes me sick"-type of pattern as I am the one who is sickened by him. "I was struck by how it is an excellent plan.... hmmm.... I 'm confused.

    I agree. :D Replace the 'it is' with (being):

    It struck me as (being) an excellent plan. SVOC


    :D

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Have a 't' on me.
    :D What? Y'gonna hoard the 'h' and the 'e'? :D

  6. #36
    infinikyte Guest

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    I hope everyone here is good and healthy. I just recovered from a two-week flu, it was horrible, I was so sick I didn't bother to go online!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    The word 'exhausted' has an inflectional -ed suffix. Words are not listed in the dictionary with inflections. Take off the -ed and you'll find the word 'exhaust'. If we add -ed to it we get a past participle in form. In our example sentence:

    She left the room exhausted.

    'exhuasted' describes her state of being. How she left. (Adverb)
    'exhausted' is an adverb.
    'exhuasted functions as an adverb.
    Sentence Pattern: SVO+Adv
    Sorry but I have to ask again: is "exhausted" really an adverb? Is it used like "surprised" in "I'm surprised."? But then "surprised" here would be an adjective? Because if
    'exhuasted' describes her state of being.
    then we can say "She is exhausted", right?


    *Sorry. Did I say SVOC originally? Sorry.
    None taken. You WERE right from the very beginning.

  7. #37
    James Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork

    Take the sentence "She is upstairs." Here, I will disagree with my colleague, Cas. Many will say that a linking verb cannot take an adverb. This is generally true, but forms of the verb "to be" are not always linking verbs. This verb can also be an intransitive stative verb, when it takes on the meaning "to exist". In my opinion, "upstairs" is an adverb, modifying the verb "is". It simply answers the question "where?" as do many adverbs. She exists upstairs.
    :D

    1. intransitive (linking) verb: SV+Adv

    She is upstairs = She situates herself upstairs. adverb

    :D Nice :D
    Thanks!
    If we can say that the sentence, "The police found him dead", is a SVOC (Subject Verb Object Adjectival complement). And if we want to say that the sentence, "He is upstairs", is a SVC (Subject Linking-Verb Adverbial complement), then we should be able to say that the sentence, "The police found him upstairs", is a SVOC (Subject Verb Object Adverbial complement). Or how about, "The police found him dead upstairs"?

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by James
    If we can say that the sentence, "The police found him dead", is a SVOC (Subject Verb Object Adjectival complement). And if we want to say that the sentence, "He is upstairs", is a SVC (Subject Linking-Verb Adverbial complement), then we should be able to say that the sentence, "The police found him upstairs", is a SVOC (Subject Verb Object Adverbial complement). Or how about, "The police found him dead upstairs"?
    Welcome

    The police found him (dead) upstairs. SVOC+adverb
    He was dead. SVC
    He was upstairs. SV+adjunct

    Note, linking verbs do not have adverbial complements; they have adverbial adjuncts. The difference between a complement and an adjunct is that complements are part of the verb, whereas adjuncts are not. They function as added information.

    He was upstairs = He exists. He exists upstairs. It's the existing and not he that happens upstairs.

    :D

    :D

  9. #39
    landekai Guest

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    Well, learnt a lot from you guy...Thank you...

  10. #40
    claude Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by landekai
    Well, learnt a lot from you guy...Thank you...
    no problem, piggy knuckle, you are welcome. :wink:

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