Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 50 of 50
  1. #41
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by landekai
    Well, learnt a lot from you guy...Thank you...
    You're welcome. :D

    (Say: "I've learned a lot from you guys." (I suppose you can use learnt in BE.))

    Welcome to our friendly forum!

    :D

  2. #42
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by claude
    Quote Originally Posted by landekai
    Well, learnt a lot from you guy...Thank you...
    no problem, piggy knuckle, you are welcome. :wink:
    Um, what's a piggy knuckle?

    :wink:

  3. #43
    infinikyte Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Um, what's a piggy knuckle?

    :wink:
    If it's meant as a kind of food, a "pig knuckle" is a traditional delicacy in Taiwan. I believe Germany has it too.

    :wink:

  4. #44
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by infinikyte
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Um, what's a piggy knuckle?

    :wink:
    If it's meant as a kind of food, a "pig knuckle" is a traditional delicacy in Taiwan. I believe Germany has it too.

    :wink:
    Thanks.
    :D

    • Tom: My butcher has pig's feet.
      Jerry: He does, does he?
      Tom: Yeah. Other than that, he's perfectly normal.


    :wink:

  5. #45
    claude Guest

    Default

    Yeah, Just as infinikyte's explanation, It is a kind of traditional Chinese food, very delicious.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    what about the function of the advervial " on the table"? in

    I put the pen on the table

    Couldn't it be analysed either as an advervial A. of Place or an OC ?


  7. #47
    graphich is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I see no reason to change the 5 basic patterns.
    I just came across this thread today. I found it interesting because I've written a grammar that puts a great deal of emphasis on sentence patterns. It's posted at http://www.ColorCodedEnglish.com. Some readers might also find it interesting that a standard reference book for English composition, The Harbrace College Handbook lists six sentence patterns.

    After a couple of years analyzing sentences, I also concluded that the five traditional patterns did not account for all English sentence structures. However, my solution was to redefine the five patterns based on verb complements.

    I recognize five verb complements: objects, predicate adverbs, predicate nouns, predicate adjectives, and predicate verbals. I actually coined the term "predicate verbal". Most grammars view them as predicates of non-finite clauses and their non-finite clauses as objects. According to transformational generative grammar, the following two sentences have the same pattern.
    "She wants him to sing". / "She said he should sing". / S - V - O

    The concept of "predicate adverbs", however, is accepted by many linguists and grammarians. These adverbs are complements as opposed to adjuncts. Grammars that recognize the term "predicate adverb" would disagree with the view that the adverbs "upstairs", "in London", "on the table", and "to my friend" are adjuncts in the following sentences.
    "He's upstairs" / "She lives in London" / "Put the book on the table" / "I gave the money to my friend".

    Distinguishing predicate adverbs from adjuncts, however, can sometimes be quite difficult. It's not a practical concept for basic grammar instruction, but it's useful for analyzing sentence patterns. Predicate adverbs of linking verbs are components of the sixth pattern in the Harbrace Handbook.

    I believe that "subject complements" share the same function as predicate adverbs. They all complete the meaning of the verb. The meaning of the subject is merely modified by subject complements. It's a misleading term.

  8. #48
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    41,604
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    Quote Originally Posted by graphich View Post

    I believe that "subject complements" share the same function as predicate adverbs. They all complete the meaning of the verb. The meaning of the subject is merely modified by subject complements. It's a misleading term.
    But if the verb is a copular verb, then is the meaning of the verb really being completed? That strikes me as a bit like the claim that they built the space station to give the shuttle somewhere to go.

  9. #49
    graphich is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    If a student says "Our teacher is a Canadian" or "Our teacher is tall" or "Our teacher is on vacation" or "Our teacher is in Hawaii", the meaning of the subject is the same in every sentence. The predicates, however, are significantly different. In Spanish, two different verbs would be needed to say the same things.

    Also consider other linking verbs which are used in the same patterns: "appear, seem, remain, became, etc." You can't replace these verbs with "exist". I don't agree that you can really use it to replace "be", e.g. "Our teacher exists on vacation".

    When forms of "be" are used in elliptical clauses, their meaning is completed by the preceding context, just like the helping verb "do" is, e.g. "Our teacher is Canadian, and I am too" / "Bob likes spicy food, but I don't."

    Some grammars make a distinction between "intransitive complete" verbs (happen, dance, exist) and "intransitive incomplete" verbs (be, seems, become). You can argue that "be" is intransitive complete, but others would argue that this is just a different meaning of "be". Certainly, when "be" is used as an auxiliary, it has a different meaning. Does "It's raining" mean the same thing as "It exists raining"?

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Are the 5 basic sentence patterns sacred?

    so far I know the patterns SVA and SVOA do exist. in fact there are 7 and more. check A comprehensive english grammar, Eckersley, page 385. if the chunk begins with a preposition it is considered as object of the preposition. e.g. I bought a book to my mother. to my mother is an object of the preposition.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345

Similar Threads

  1. Dear MikeNewYork... sentence fragment
    By wendy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2009, 09:50
  2. Sentence Patterns
    By raelynn in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2004, 20:50
  3. five basic patterns
    By Chibi in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 21:48
  4. grammar
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2003, 19:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk