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    #1

    Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English areas

    Hello! I am not native English and try to write an English CV for the first time. I have made my A-levels not too long ago, so I wanted to write about how I did in school.
    If I wrote a CV in my mother language, I would have written down my grades at the A-levels, the averange of my grades in my last year and that I have recieved an "honor" for students called "ausgezeichneter Erfolg" each year. You get it in high school when the averange or your grade is bellow 1.5 (1=A, 2=B, 3=C,...) and you don't have anything worse than a C your major subjects.
    Now I have two Problems:
    1) Is there something like this "honor" in English or some way I can translate or explain it?
    2) It's easy to say what the averenge of your grade is, when you have numbers as grades, but how can you do that or talk about your grades in General, when the grades are given in letters? Do you even do that or do English-speaking peaple care less about such things than German-speaking People (like me)
    I don't want to tell something uninteressting in my CV, so I could let that out, but seeing as I kind of just started to study at a University my school successes are pretty much the best I have.

    I am very grateful for every answer!

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    #2

    Re: Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English a

    1 Could you say with the highest rating ("ausgezeichneter Erfolg")
    2 If you get A & C, you could claim that your average is B, but we don't do this- we normally treat them as individual grades in the UK.
    Last edited by Tdol; 08-Apr-2014 at 01:53. Reason: UK added

  1. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English a

    (Not a Teacher)

    Latin honors are typically associated with undergraduate degrees such as the bachelor's degree, but I think you could apply them to diplomas as well. If you met the requirements for an honors distinction and had the highest grade point average of your class, you could say you graduated "summa cum laude". If you got the second highest, "magna cum laude". If you simply made honors, then "cum laude". You can also say that you graduated with honors (or highest honors if you made the top grade in your class) or that you were a distinguished graduate from your class. We also have special terms for folks with the highest and second-highest grade point average: the valedictorian and the salutatorian.

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    #4

    Re: Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English a

    Grades in letters can be converted to numbers and averaged. In the US, an A=4, B=3, etc. and the average is called a GPA (grade point average).

    Those with a high GPA after any given grading period are on the "honor roll" or "high honor roll."

    This is for middle and high schools.

    For college, the honor roll is called the "dean's list."

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    #5

    Re: Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English a

    Thanks for your answer! Are the special terms for the best of the class or the school?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Is there some kind of "honor" (like suma cum laude) for "doing-well" in English a

    In the USA, many schools honor the best student in a class with the title "valedictorian" and second best student as "salutatorian".

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