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Thread: in the dock

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    #1

    in the dock

    "supermarkets back in the dock over waste"

    What does the headline mean? Does it mean "supermarkets are accused again of issues about waste"?

    Thanks!

    Jason
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 07-Apr-2014 at 09:50. Reason: Reducing to default font size.

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in the dock

    In the courtroom of a criminal trial the space where the accused is confined is called the dock. So your interpretation is correct: it means the supermarkets have yet again been accused of ...

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    #3

    Re: in the dock

    The expression is not used in AmE, but I have read it before.

    Our courtrooms do have a list of cases called a "docket."

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    #4

    Re: in the dock

    Out of curiosity, in AmE, what do you call the box/area where the accused stands in a courtroom?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #5

    Re: in the dock

    You "take the stand" when you are giving testimony in a courtroom.

    Of course, that is not just the defendant.

    The defendant sits at the defense table with his legal team.

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    #6

    Re: in the dock

    So would "He is in the dock" become "He is on the stand"?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #7

    Re: in the dock

    Not in the same sense as "in the dock" is used in BrE.

    We don't have such an expression to mean someone is being tried for a crime.

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: in the dock

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    You "take the stand" when you are giving testimony in a courtroom.

    Of course, that is not just the defendant.

    The defendant sits at the defense table with his legal team.
    The defendant sits at the table with his counsel only if he is free on bail. If he is a prisoner he stays in the dock with his guards.

    The witness stand is something else: the place reserved for the current witness.

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    #9

    Re: in the dock

    We would say "in court" for someone accused of a crime or sued civilly.

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