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Thread: either

  1. #1
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    Default either

    In american english does "either" have a different pronunciation?
    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: either

    ei as in ee of see is more common.

    Read more here: http://www.bartleby.com/64/C007/072.html

  3. #3
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    Exclamation Re: either

    Quote Originally Posted by lenorj
    In american english does "either" have a different pronunciation?
    Thanks in advance.
    Not only in American English, but in BOTH British & American English

    >> either can be pronounced as "aI" i.e. with diphtong as in hi/bye/tie/pie, etc. AND i:T@ .... i.e. long vowel as in "see/fee/tea, etc.

    AND EXACTLY SAME GOES FOR

    >> neither

  4. #4
    matilda Guest

    Talking Re: either

    either in American English is pronunced like /ee/ in /been/ , or /i/ in /pin/.


    Matilda

  5. #5
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    Default Re: either

    The link (See post #2) addresses that as well.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: either

    Matilda, not /i/ in /pin/, but [ai] as in pine, sigh, pie, and my.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: either

    And neither is it pronounced as "ee" in "been", which, in most American speech, rhymes perfectly with "pin".

  8. #8
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    Default Re: either

    ei•ther /aI(r); i(r)/ det., pron., adv.
    det., pron.
    1 one or the other of two; it does not matter which: You can park on either side of the street. You can keep one of the photos. Either of them—whichever you like. There are two types of qualification—either is acceptable. note at neither
    2 each of two: The offices on either side were empty. There’s a door at either end of the corridor.
    adv.
    1 used after negative phrases to state that a feeling or situation is similar to one already mentioned: Pete can’t go and I can’t either. (NAmE, informal) ‘I don’t like it.’ ‘Me either.’ (= Neither do I).
    2 used to add extra information to a statement: I know a good Italian restaurant. It’s not far from here, either.
    3 either ... or ... used to show a choice of two things: Well, I think she’s either Russian or Polish. I’m going to buy either a camera or a DVD player with the money. Either he could not come or he did not want to.—compare or note at neither

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: either

    Gokhan, if you quote from a dictionary, could you give the source or the URL- forums have to be careful about copyright. Many thanks.

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