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  1. #1
    dihen is offline Member
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    "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Is it correct to use either "play a piece of music" or "play a music piece"? If it is, is the meaning different?

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Hello Dihen

    Only "play a piece of music" is idiomatic.

    MrP

  3. #3
    dihen is offline Member
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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic
    Hello Dihen
    Only "play a piece of music" is idiomatic.
    MrP
    But isn't "music piece" used sometimes?; like when its meaning is more similar to "song"?

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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    A "piece of music" or simply a "piece" {This piece was composed in 1990}.

    "Piece" works after "chamber music" {This chamber music piece was first played in Carnegie Hall}. Otherwise it's organ piece, trumpet piece, piano piece. . .

  5. #5
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen
    But isn't "music piece" used sometimes?; like when its meaning is more similar to "song"?
    Well, when I first read your question, the phrase "music piece" seemed unidiomatic to me. There do seem to be a lot of googles for the phrase "a music piece", however (many of which seem to relate to music-making software).

    So "music piece" is indeed used sometimes; but I would agree with River about the standard usage.

    MrP

  6. #6
    dihen is offline Member
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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic
    Well, when I first read your question, the phrase "music piece" seemed unidiomatic to me. There do seem to be a lot of googles for the phrase "a music piece", however (many of which seem to relate to music-making software).
    `
    So "music piece" is indeed used sometimes; but I would agree with River about the standard usage.
    MrP
    You, again, wrote something that I would make a mistake with: this one. :

    "however (many of which seem to relate to music-making software)"
    If I wrote it, I would write "however (many of them seem to relate to music-making software)", but using "many of them" there would not sound foreign, right?

  7. #7
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: "piece of music" or "music piece"?

    Hello Dihen

    You're right, it wouldn't sound foreign. It might sound a little abrupt, though, to some speakers: "many of which" connects itself to the previous clause with a relative pronoun ("which"), whereas "many of them" has no connection. But that's easy enough to rectify: you can put an "and" before "many" (i.e. "and many of them...").

    See you later,
    MrP

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