Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    nininaz's Avatar
    nininaz is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question have your scales memorized

    Hello Teachers,
    We use have something done to mean another person does a service for us.
    So Why do we use ' have + something + done " in the following sentence?Because 'M' is going to do it by himself/herself and don't want to get somebody else to do something for her/him.


    "M: Do you have any pointers for how to prepare for the audition?
    W: Well, you will be tested on style, tempo, dynamics, scales, tone,
    range, and sight-reading.
    M: That’s a lot of stuff. What is the most important?
    W: You’d better have your scales memorized and be ready for
    sight-reading.
    M: I know my scales. I’ve played the trumpet since middle school.
    So, I’ll focus on my sight-reading."
    Last edited by nininaz; 01-May-2014 at 16:26.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,579
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    No need for confusion. In your example, 'have' is a simple auxiliary. W could equally say ''You'd better have memorized...'. In the expression 'have something done', have isn't an auxiliary. It's a sort of 'pro-verb' (I made that up, on the analogy of pronoun) that stands for commission/arrange for/get... [although I suppose get is a bit of a 'pro-verb' too. ])

    b

  3. #3
    nininaz's Avatar
    nininaz is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    Thanks for your help. I am not native speaker so understanding your explanation is so so hard to me .

  4. #4
    Roman55's Avatar
    Roman55 is online now Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    841
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    So Why do we use ' have + something + done " in the following sentence?
    I am not a teacher.

    We don't. It's not "having your scales memorized by someone else"

    You had better have memorized them by the time you sit the audition. It's a strong recommendation to memorize them.
    Last edited by Roman55; 01-May-2014 at 23:59.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,667
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post

    We use "have something done" to mean another person does a service for us.
    We do, but we also use it when we tell someone else to do something (or, in the perfect tense, to have something done). In some cases, it doesn't matter who does it, but in your example, the context plainly indicates that it's you who needs to have it memorised.

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,287
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    I don't associate this use of "have something done" with the usage meaning "to arrange for something to be done". For me, it's simply an alternative word order.

    You'd better have done your homework by the time I get back from work.
    You'd better have your homework done by the time I get back from work.

    "to have it done" simply means "make sure it's completed/finished".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #7
    nininaz's Avatar
    nininaz is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "to have it done" simply means "make sure it's completed/finished".

    Do you mean the following section is my answer?
    4
    have something ready/done/finished etc
    to have made something ready to be used, or have finished doing something:I should have the car ready by Monday


  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,579
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: have your scales memorized

    Yes - although I don't think the example is very helpful, because it doesn't show the 'have + participle' construction - so you're forgiven for not getting the answer from a dictionary! 'I should have the job finished by Monday' would be clearer.

    b

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] Scale or scales?
    By Jack8rkin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2010, 11:32
  2. scales and gills
    By Rona 12 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Nov-2009, 19:11
  3. off the scales
    By unpakwon in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Oct-2008, 15:02
  4. to tip the scales
    By PINKGREAT in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2008, 00:42
  5. At all scales
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2007, 17:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •