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  1. #1
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    Default Have to and Must ?

    Dear all
    I have a question about using "have to" and "must"?
    I found them both in my dictionary and it said in the same meaning.
    Could you please explain that for me?
    Thank you in advance.
    Best regards.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    Well... they are very much the same. There isn't really much to explain ;)

  3. #3
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    Post Re: Have to and Must ?

    Thank you but you mean I can use "have to" instead of "must" or "must" instead of "have to" right?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    they're completely interchangeable. There's no need, even, to alter the structure for they accept the same verb forms:

    I HAVE TO do this
    I MUST do this

    You can take whichever, whenever. Although have to sometimes conveys an inner desire whereas must an imposed obligation, but that's way too dependent on context.

  5. #5
    subdolus is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    I think there is difference between “must” and “have to”. My teacher taught me that “Must” is personal and “have to” is impersonal. I am not a teacher and I cannot explain it exactly. I hope somebody clarify it better than I can.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    It can be, but not in this case... methinks

  7. #7
    matilda Guest

    Talking Re: Have to and Must ?

    when you have to do s.th, that means that someone else forces you to do that.
    but when you must do the same thing, you yourself force yourself in doing that .

    eg. I have to go to the university, and study engeering.

    that means that my mother, my father, or anyone else forces me study engeering. it may mean1- i dont want to continue my education untill university.2-i dont like engeering.

    but if you say:
    I must study engeering.

    that means for example my causin studied engeering and i don't want him to be higher than me, SO I FORCE MY SELF TO STUDY THAT MAJOR, and nobody else forces me to do that.


    hope that helps

    Matilda

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    Unfortunately, the difference between "must" and "have to" is a bit more complicated than that. This is one of the trickier points about modal verbs in English, and causes no end of problems.

    The first problem with "must" is that it is "defective". A "defective verb" is a verb with bits missing. Most verbs, for example, have an infinitve: "to play", "to sing", etc. Defective verbs do not: you cannot say "to must". Defective verbs do not have present participles ("musting" does not exist) or perfect participles ("have musted" is impossible). In addition, "must" (unusually even for a defective verb) has no past tense form.

    Luckily, English has a way to deal with this problem. You can usually express what a defective verb normally expresses by using an alternative. For example, instead of "can" you can use "to be able to", which has an infinitive form, a present participle ("being able to") and a past participle ("been able to").

    The alternative for "must" is "have to": infinitive "to have to", present participle "having to", past participle "had to", past tense "had to". So whenever you can't use "must", the verb "have to" takes its place:

    Have you ever had to phone the police? (NOT: *Have you ever musted phone...)

    That's okay, but the problem is that in the negative, they don't mean the same thing at all:

    "You mustn't" means that something is not allowed: "You mustn't smoke here."

    "You don't have to" means that something is not necessary: "You don't have to work tomorrow if you don't want to."

    So, in the negative, the replacement for "must not" is "not to be allowed to". "not to have to" is the replacement for "may not".

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    According to Michael Swan in 'Practical English Usage':
    There are some differences between must and have to.
    1. concluding that something is certain
    Both must and have (got) to can be used to express the conclusion that something is certain. Must is unusual in this sense in American English,especially in speech.Have (got) to used to be unusual in British English in this sense,but it is now becoming common.(Example on request )
    2.necessity and obligation
    Must and have (got) to can both be used in British English to talk about necessity. In American English,have to is more common,especially in speech.Plants must/have to get enough light and water if they are to grow properly.
    Both verbs can be used in British English to talk about obligation. (In American English,have to is the normal form.)British English often makes a distinction as follows.Must is used mostly to talk about the feelings and wishes of the speaker and hearer-for example,to give or ask for orders.Have (got) to is used mostly to talk about obligations that come from 'outside'-for example from laws,regulations,agreements and other people's orders.(examples on request-for obvious reasons)
    Opinions about what people should do can be expressed with must or should,but not usually with have to in British English.
    People must/should understand that the world is changing.
    Question to the moderators:Is it ethically correct to write long answers?If not,pls tell me

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Have to and Must ?

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu
    According to Michael Swan in 'Practical English Usage':
    There are some differences between must and have to.
    1. concluding that something is certain
    Both must and have (got) to can be used to express the conclusion that something is certain. Must is unusual in this sense in American English,especially in speech.Have (got) to used to be unusual in British English in this sense,but it is now becoming common.(Example on request )
    2.necessity and obligation
    Must and have (got) to can both be used in British English to talk about necessity. In American English,have to is more common,especially in speech.Plants must/have to get enough light and water if they are to grow properly.
    Both verbs can be used in British English to talk about obligation. (In American English,have to is the normal form.)British English often makes a distinction as follows.Must is used mostly to talk about the feelings and wishes of the speaker and hearer-for example,to give or ask for orders.Have (got) to is used mostly to talk about obligations that come from 'outside'-for example from laws,regulations,agreements and other people's orders.(examples on request-for obvious reasons)
    Opinions about what people should do can be expressed with must or should,but not usually with have to in British English.
    People must/should understand that the world is changing.
    Question to the moderators:Is it ethically correct to write long answers?If not,pls tell me

    ı agree with you. it must be so...

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