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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default be willing to do...(2)

    Sorry for bothering you with the same question again.

    I already asked once about the nuance of "be willing to."


    Actually, the sentence in the book was "I'll buy you a meal if you're willing to try that new Italian restaurant."

    In the book, the phrase "be willing to" was explained in contrast to the phrase "be reluctant to do."

    In addition, it says that unlike to the phrases "be glad to do" and "be pleased to do", "be willing to do" has a nuance that the speaker doesn't care about the results.

    Because what I have known so far was that "be willing to " is used in case when the speaker want to do something. In that case, not caring about the result sounds a little bit strange to me... so...

    -- Isn't there any case when "be willing to do" has a nuance of "not caring about the results"?

    --- What about the sentence above which is about trying a new restaurant?


    Thank you very much!

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: be willing to do...(2)

    Actually, the sentence in the book was "I'll buy you a meal if you're willing to try that new Italian restaurant."
    The person who is "willing to try" a new restaurant probably cares quite a bit about the result. If it is a bad experience, he might not go back. Indeed, if somebody is "willing to try" something it is because he is optimistic that the result will be a good one. (He is at least hopeful if not optimistic.) It would not be at all accurate to say he doesn't care. In fact, the opposite is true.

    In the book, the phrase "be willing to" was explained in contrast to the phrase "be reluctant to do."
    Those phrases are not opposites. (A person can be reluctant to do something but still be willing to try.) The opposite of reluctant is eager.

    In addition, it says that unlike to the phrases "be glad to do" and "be pleased to do", "be willing to do" has a nuance that the speaker doesn't care about the results.
    In my experience, no such nuance exists.

    Because what I have known so far was that "be willing to " is used in case when the speaker want to do something. In that case, not caring about the result sounds a little bit strange to me...
    It's a bit strange to me too. :wink:

    Isn't there any case when "be willing to do" has a nuance of "not caring about the results"?
    I don't expect to ever see one.

    What about the sentence above which is about trying a new restaurant?
    Ask yourself if you would care about the results. What is your answer?

    :)

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