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  1. #1
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    Unhappy It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    hi
    I read this sentence but it doesn't make sence to me .even I have tried a lot
    I know that any body read it he/she is gonna say it does!!
    well, if it makes sense to you
    please explain it to me or write it in other way to make it easy

    During the evaluation process, qualitative and quantitative judgments about the extent to which the material and methods satisfy the external and internal criteria must be made.

    now this phrase(the red phrase) the extent to which is just .... I dont know
    Can you please tell me its definition explanation
    another problem; "qualitative and quantitative" Is there differenc??!


    After 5 hours I have an exam on the subject in which this sentence is mentioned. I know your reply is coming too late but its OK I want to understand it any way
    THANKS IN ADVANCE

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    Hello Jesse

    1. During the evaluation process, qualitative and quantitative judgments about the extent to which the material and methods satisfy the external and internal criteria must be made.

    "...the extent to which..." here means "how well".

    "Qualitative" relates to how good something is (quality). "Quantitative" relates to how much of it there is (quantity).

    So it means "judgements will be made about how well the material and methods satisfy the internal and external criteria, in terms of quality and quantity".

    For instance, if the scenario is "delivering fresh milk to the supermarket", it might work out as follows:

    1. Material milk.
    2. Methods delivery vans.
    3. Internal criteria the standards the farmer sets for his milk production.
    4. External criteria the standards the supermarket sets.
    5. Qualitative judgements how good the milk is.
    6. Quantitative judgements how much is produced.

    Is that any clearer?

    MrP

  3. #3
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    Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    Hello MrPedantic
    Thank you very very much
    that is so clear
    I have two questions. I hope that doesnt bother.
    1)you wrote the standards the farmer sets for his milk production.
    Do you mean the standards and the farmer sets?
    2)If you open an English dictionary you will find more than twenty five meanings for SET .Actually, I always find SET a hard word! It scares me when I see it coz I dont know what meaning I should take...!
    What does SET mean here? Do you have an advise to solve my problem with SET word
    I really appreciate that thank you in advance

  4. #4
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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    I believe I read somewhere once that no word in the English language has as many different definitions as "set."

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    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    Hello Jesse20

    No bother at all! By "the standards the farmer sets for his milk production", I meant "the farmer's standards and targets for his business": e.g. he might expect his cows to produce a certain amount of milk per day; and he might also have certain standards of hygiene which he required his staff to observe.

    "Set" scares me too (almost as much as "get"). It's a very difficult word to simplify! Here, though, it means "establish"; and "establish" might be a useful synonym for many of its meanings.

    "Set" seems to be related etymologically to "sit". So in its transitive uses, it often has a sense of "to put in place", "to put in position"; and in its intransitive uses, it often has a sense of "to become established", e.g.

    1. Shall we set a date for the next meeting?
    "set" here = establish, put in place.

    2. I set the alarm for half past six.
    "set" here = "to put in place".

    3. The jelly set quite quickly.
    "set" here = "to become solid".

    But the real difficulty is with "set" in phrasal verbs. With these, it seems the only solution is to learn each one separately, unfortunately.

    Let me know if it's still a bit unclear!

    MrP

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    Exclamation Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    Hi MrPedantic
    Ammm,MrPedantic what I actually needed in this sentence "the standards the farmer sets for his milk production" a slight change. I mean not a total change.especially this one. Because I dont know what is the wrong that made this sentence sort of unclear and by giving that slight change I will know my problem(why I'm not getting the sence of the sentence)
    So,does this statement give the same meaning?
    -the standards THAT the farmer sets for his milk production
    OR-the standards OF the farmer sets for his milk production
    SET PROBLEM
    you know what...!MrPedantic
    I think that I should have some extra time(e.g.one hour) to study it completely in OXFORD dictionary . Actually, that is my way if I find a problem with a word frequently.
    your explanation is absolutely made it easy to me. your explanation of the "evaluation process statement" is just fabulous.
    thank you SO much MrPedantic

  7. #7
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: It just doesn't make sense! TRY

    Hello Jesse

    You're welcome!

    Of your two versions of the "standards" sentence, this is what I meant:

    1. The standards THAT the farmer sets for his milk production...

    Does that make it clearer now?

    Let me know if not!

    Bye
    MrP

    PS: I think I may join you in studying "set". There are several pages in my dictionary too...

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