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Thread: gramar

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default gramar

    There are several gramar techniques I need to learn, were can I find rules and ecercises?.

    1) The use of apostrophe
    2) The use of conjunction "of"
    3) When to use "a" or "an"
    4) when to use "one" or "ones"
    5) when is needed to use "however"
    6 what is the use of "this" versus "these"
    7) when to use "ed" at the end of a word?
    8 when to use brought or bring
    9) Use of "it"
    10) use of "ing"
    11) use of e
    12) be being
    13) rules for double consonants
    14) use of

  2. #2
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    I'll leave this for one of our teachers to answer.

    (sorry it has taken so long to reply - I've no idea why, but our forum did not show this message until now)
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  3. #3
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    I'll take number three. :wink:

    Use a before a noun that begins with a consonant sound. Example: "I want to buy a car." Use an before a noun that begins with a vowel sound. Example: "I would like an apple."

    If you register with the forum you will receive email notifications of messages.

    :)

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    2) The use of conjunction "of"

    'Of' is used to join words together when no moification of meaning is required- 'Cup of coffeee'. Here it merely joins the two words and doesn't modify them in any other way. It is the second most common word in the English language.

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    Use apostrophes to form contractions or to show possession. It is important to note that the possessive pronouns do not use apostrophes to indicate possession. Also, apostrophes are not used (except incorrectly) to pluralize words.

    contractions
    • can't = can not
      aren't =are not
      isn't = is not
      it's = it is
      wasn't = was not
      they're = they are
      we're we are
      I'm = I am
      I'll = I will
      she'll = she will
      he'll he will
      they'll = they will
      he's = he is
      she's she is


    possessives
    • dog's = belonging to the dog
      Red's = belonging to Red
      Tdol's = belonging to Tdol
      Ron's = belonging to Ron
      Mike's = belonging to Mike


    :wink:

  6. #6
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    4) when to use "one" or "ones"

    One is a singular pronoun, where there is a choice- I've got five newspapers, take one.

    Ones is plural- I'm not eating any more biscuits- the last ones I ate made me feel sick.

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    Default Re: gramar

    Quote Originally Posted by mama
    There are several grammar techniques I need to learn, where can I find rules and exercises?. [

    6) what is the use of "this" versus "these"
    7) when to use "ed" at the end of a word?
    8) when to use brought or bring
    'this' and 'these' are demonstrative pronouns used to refer to items/people close to the speaker. Use 'this' for singular and 'these' for plural. Example:

    This book (over here) is blue.
    These books (over here) are blue.

    Use 'that' (singular) and 'those' (plural) to refer to items/people far from the speaker. Example:

    That book (over there) is blue.
    Those books (over there) are blue.

    '-ed' is a past tense suffix. Add it to verbs to form the past tense. Example:

    I walk today.
    I walked yesterday.

    Some verbs don't take '-ed'. Those verbs are called irregular verbs. Example:

    bring => brought

    You have to memorize the list of irregular verbs. All other verbs take '-ed'.

    :D

  8. #8
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    The present tense is bring. The past tense and past participle is brought.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/vi...?p=13292#13292

  9. #9
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    Use however to contradict in some fashion what has previously been said. Example:
    • I agree with you that today is a good day to go skiing. However, I don't think you should go. It might also be a good day for avalanches.

  10. #10
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    Re:
    • 9) Use of "it"
      10) use of "ing"
      11) use of e

    Use it as a pronoun. Example:
    • A: Do you know what happened to the cheese?
      B: Yes, I ate the last of it.

    In the above example, it is a pronoun for cheese.

    Use ing to form the present progressive or present participle. Examples:
    • I enjoy swimming. Yesterday, I went swimming. I am swimming again today. I shall go swimming again tomorrow.


    In English, we use e at the end of a word to indicate a long vowel sound. Examples:
    • mat, mate
      rat, rate
      sat, sate
      not, note
      rot, rote
      bit, bite
      sit, site
      cut, cute
      mut, mute

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