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    #11
    to be

    The verb to be is the most irregular of the irregular verbs.

    First person singular: am
    • Do you know who I am?
      I am the person you see when you look in the mirror.
      That's who I am.
      I am the person I am.


    Go to: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/vi...?p=13314#13314

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    #12
    With most words that one syllable in length and end in a single consonant, the past or progressive tense is formed by doubling the final consonant and adding -ed or -ing. Examples:
    • slip, slipped, slipping
      slap, slapped, slapping
      trap, trapped, trapping
      top, topped, topping
      tap, tapped, tapping
      fan, fanned, fanning
      gum, gummed, gumming
      sum, summed, summing
      drum, drummed, drumming
      trim, trimmed, trimming
      slim, slimmed, slimming
      grin, grinned, grinning
      cram, crammed, cramming
      slam, slammed, slamming
      lob, lobbed, lobbing
      grab, grabbed, grabbing
      trip, tripped, tripping

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    #13
    A single consonant after a single vowel.

    In BE we also double the final 'l' in two syllable words, like 'travelling', but our American friends don't follow suit.

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    #14
    12) be being

    This is very rarely used. Yo u will occasionally hear 'He will be being picked up at this very moment', but it is an uncomfortable usage and we tend to avoid it. The same is true of 'been being'.

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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    A single consonant after a single vowel.

    In BE we also double the final 'l' in two syllable words, like 'travelling', but our American friends don't follow suit.
    Yes, that's right. It's a single consonant after a single vowel. The same pattern is followed with adjectives, thus:
    • big, bigger, biggest
      fat, fatter, fattest
      fit, fitter, fittest
      hot, hotter, hottest
      sad, sadder, saddest
      tan, tanner, tannest
      dun, dunner, dunnest
      glum, glummer, glummest
      slim, slimmer, slimmest
      trim, trimmer, trimmest
      thin, thinner, thinnest

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