Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. Masfer
    Guest
    #1

    I like doing / I like to do - Differences

    What is the difference between like doing sth and like to do sth ?
    Could you give an example to make it clearer ?

    Thanks in advance !

  2. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,570
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2
    While there isn't necessarily a difference between them, there could be. I like dancing could mean that you get enjoyment out of dancing (doing it) or that you like to watch people dance, while I like to dance only means that you enjoy dancing (doing it). Having said that, in fact, there is hardly ever any difference between the two. After all, I like watching TV and I like to watch TV are the same. I like swimming and I like to swim are also the same.

    :)

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 16,129
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: I like doing / I like to do - Differences

    Quote Originally Posted by Masfer
    What is the difference between like doing sth and like to do sth ?
    Could you give an example to make it clearer ?

    Thanks in advance !
    There are a number of verbs that can take either a gerund (-ing verbal) or an infinitive (to + verb form) as a complement. "Like" is one of those verbs. When a verb can take either complement, the combination with the gerund and the combination with the infinitive can have differing meanings. In some cases, the difference in meaning is subtle; in other cases, it is dramatic.

    As a rule, the gerund form will be more real, more concrete, more based on action. The infinitive form will be more hypothetical, more conceptual, less concrete.

    I like swimming = more focused on the activity of swimming
    I like to swim = more focused on the idea of swimming

    With the verb like, the differences are subtle. One could use either to communicate a like of swimming, but the subtle differences are there.

  4. Masfer
    Guest
    #4

    re

    Thank you both for your answers.
    It is perfectly clear now 8)
    In school I've always been told:
    You always have to write: like verb+ing.

    Now I know they were cheating me
    ByE!

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5
    In BE, we tend to use the gerund for a general state of affairs and the infinitive for specific circumstances:

    I like reading. (general state)
    I don't like to read in cars. (specific circumstance- it makes me car sick)

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 16,129
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In BE, we tend to use the gerund for a general state of affairs and the infinitive for specific circumstances:

    I like reading. (general state)
    I don't like to read in cars. (specific circumstance- it makes me car sick)
    Hmmm. That almost sounds opposite to AE, except I agree with your examples.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7
    Another area where you lot have got it wrong?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 16,129
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Another area where you lot have got it wrong?

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Another area where you lot have got it wrong?

Similar Threads

  1. British and American English Differences
    By guofei_ma in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2006, 06:01
  2. question on differences
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Oct-2004, 20:35
  3. sentences differences
    By sky753 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2004, 20:49
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Apr-2004, 20:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •