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Thread: kind of ,kinda

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    Talking kind of ,kinda

    hi everyone
    I want to be aware of the exact meanings of kind of , kinda
    1-what is the difference?
    2-how many meanings does it have? and what are they ?
    I really appreciate some examples
    3-where and when can I use kind of , kinda

  2. #2
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    Talking Re: kind of ,kinda

    kinda = kind of
    This form is used in written English to represent the phrase 'kind of' when it is pronounced informally, e.g.
    I'd kinda like to have a sheep farm somewhere in Mexico.
    Well, I kinda knew you'd say that.
    Ryan's cute but he's kinda young.

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    Talking Re: kind of ,kinda

    "Kinda" is a banal word that means nothing. Ex:

    I'm kinda nervious tonight.

    Please, avoid such goofs.

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    Cool Re: kind of ,kinda

    It wasn't a goof, really. Since I'm not a native speaker of English I always use dictionaries before I write anything. And one of the dictionaries I own says:
    kinda (informal) = kind of - to some extent; slightly.
    Cheers.

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    Angry Re: kind of ,kinda

    It depends from where you live, cos I have a teacher of the language who can say same thing

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    Default Re: kind of ,kinda


    1-what is the difference?
    As engee's post offers, "kinda" is reduction of "kind of". The sound [f] is dropped, and the sound represented by the letter "o" is reduced to a schwa (e.g., the sound "e" in "the"), written as "a".

    kind of => kinda

    2-how many meanings does it have? and what are they?
    "kind of ~ kinda" has two meanings: (1) type of and (2) in part, to some extent. Note that, "sort of" is synonymous with (1) and (2):

    EX: I feel sort of/kind of /kinda tired. <in part, to some extent; Only meaning (2) works here>
    EX: I feel type of tired. <incorrect; meaning (1) "type of" doesn't work here>
    EX: I have a type of/sort of/kinda car that takes unleaded gas. (Only meaning (1) works here)

    3-where and when can I use kind of , kinda
    "kinda" is informal.

    EX: What kind of/kinda cheese do you like?
    EX: These kinds of questions are difficult. <"kinda" won't work here because "kinds of" is plural.>
    EX: I feel kind of/kinda sad.

    Hope that helps.

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