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  1. #1
    Idiomaticus is offline Junior Member
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    Default Tossing the cookies

    Hello. In a movie I heard the expression 'tossing the cookies', but I didn't find it in a concise dictionary of idioms. Maybe you can shed light on this, as I would like to use this idiom instead of vertigo, nausea cause by uncontrolled spinning in a helicopter. I guess my question is, first if this is proper idiom, and then whether can it concern the actual vertigo, and not just disgust, like in that movie. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    If it's disgust, it could be a reference to vomiting. I haven't heard it, but I have heard things like something disgusting making a person want to lose their lunch (be sick). If you can't find it easily in dictionaries, then it's probably not really a proper idiom- to be that, it has to be recognised by a large number of members of the speech community.

  3. #3
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    "Tossing one's cookies" means to vomit. There are a lot of colorful (if not disgusting) idioms in English to describe the act of regurgitating:

    Doing the technicolor yawn
    Pray to the porcelain god
    Lose your lunch
    Blow chunks
    Upchuck
    Barf
    Hurl

    Mind you, all of these are slang expressions describing the actual act of vomiting. They are not synonyms for dizziness or vertigo. To properly use them, you would say "that helicopter ride made me want to toss my cookies" or "If I go on that rollercoaster I'll lose my lunch for sure."

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    Thanks, Ouisch- most of the British vomit have an association with drink and takeraway food.

  5. #5
    Idiomaticus is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    This was helpful. But might I ask a question that has nothing to do with this forum? I heard of airsickness regarding planes, but can you get sick like that in a helicopter in a good working order (no uncontrolled spinning or whatever) and toss your cookies (vomit), or this would be ridiculous to you? In the movie Fly, the main character would get sick even on a bicycle, but he was an extreme case. I need this info for a, you might say, a hobby of mine..

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    Since a helicopter is basically a glass bubble, and the occupants can see upwards, downwards, and all around while flying (unlike a plane where all you have is a small window), it's not unusual for novice riders to suffer from a bout of vertigo. From the bit of research I've done, it appears that anyone who is prone to airsickness when flying on an airplane could very well suffer from it when flying in a helicopter.

  7. #7
    Idiomaticus is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    That sounds right. You know, I do not want to start a new tread because this is probably known to most or everyone whose mother tongue is English, so I will pose my question here.. It is about 'crossing the line', as in some movie someone said 'I crossed the line', meaning he made an impolite statement or something like that. But what I really want to know is if I can say 'I didn't cross decency's line', or I do not have to mention decency since it is understood? But is it really understood since sentence I extrapolated it from is weird, and perhaps someone could associate it with murder? So, can the term 'crossing the line' be used not just for something out of order regarding spoken words, but even for extreme situations, fatalities, like when someone kills someone, say, with rotor blades of helicopter? Or that is a bit extreme for such an expression, and it is never used in such context?? I appreciate any response, other than that which crosses the line..
    Last edited by Idiomaticus; 13-May-2006 at 01:02.

  8. #8
    Ouisch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    "Crossing the line" means going too far, or going overboard, either morally or otherwise. The saying comes from an old practice when two men would circle each other and exchange angry words...one man would ultimately draw a line in the dirt with the toe of his boot or shoe, and dare the other man to step over it. A fight would then ensue.

    To use the phrase in the context of murder via helicopter, I think the conversation would have to go something like: "I know you were upset with Fred, but I think you crossed the line when you shoved him headfirst into the spinning blades of that helicopter."

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    Idiomaticus is offline Junior Member
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    Thumbs up Re: Tossing the cookies

    You are being sarcastic, right? I mean you sure as hell cross the line when you do something like that to Fred. But you know, I used this expression (crossing the line) on other forum today, and I am sure that it fits, regardless of spinning blades, as I am not forcing such situation no more. Thanks anyway.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Tossing the cookies

    I'm not sure what movie you heard it from, and it would have to be said in context: But tossing the cookies is technically vomiting. It is also used in slang to mean a sexual act. . My guess is that thats the context your movie used it in.


    edit: re-read your first post, apparently that isn't how your movie used it.

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