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Thread: Thanks Casiopea

  1. #1
    Hisrory teacher Guest

    Default Thanks Casiopea

    Dear Casiopea,
    Thanks for your help about my sentence that I posted just now. I have got the clear picture of the use of " barred " from. I would appreciate again if you could enlighten me on the use of the preposition in the following sentence.

    Students who did not achieve the minimum requirements of 75 percent attendance will barred from sitting for the final examination.

    In the above sentence, is it correct to put the preposition " for " ? or can I omit " for " ( barred from sitting for the final examination )

    Thanks for your help again.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Thanks Casiopea

    Sorry for the late reply.

    "sit for an exam", yes, so "for" works. Mind you, "barred" is still somewhat problematic, in my humble opinion. You've barred from, which is fine, but it's followed by "for" which plays semantics with "barred for (taking the final exam)".

    Students ... will be barred from sitting for the final examination.

    I'd axe "barred". What about?

    ... will not be permitted to sit (for) the final examination.

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