View Poll Results: I ____ my homework at home.

Voters
1871. This poll is closed
  • forgot

    829 44.31%
  • left

    817 43.67%
  • Either

    225 12.03%
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Thread: Forgot\Left

  1. #31
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    You could say:
    I forgot to bring it (and I left it at home).
    You could also say:
    The dog ate it.

  2. #32
    emergine is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    I forgot my homework at home is right

  3. #33
    ituaku is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    i would certainly vote for left...
    forgot just ain't rite...

    'i forgot my homework at home' sounded as if he (let say he's away from home) suddenly remembered he forgot to do his homework at home..

    meanwhile

    'i left my homework at home' means he intentionally or either way left his homework at home, in other words just forgot to bring it to school or anywhere...

    dats wat i think...

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    Quote Originally Posted by emergine View Post
    I forgot my homework at home is right
    Well, that's settled then.

    I agree that it should be 'left'.

    I agree that 'left' does not imply intention.

    I would say that 'forgot' is perfectly acceptable colloquial AE.

    I've had this discussion with many many English teaching friends over here from the US, UK, Canada, Oz and NZ and generally they agree.

    So there you go... it's many many vs emergine. I love science!

    BTW, as a newb forgive me but I couldn't find an explanation of what these polls are for: acceptable standard usage (including vernacular and colloquialisms) or acceptable for teaching...?! I teach that 'forgot' in this context is wrong, but acceptable conversational colloquial AE.

    BTWII
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    I forgot my homework at home. SVO+adjunct modifier
    ...
    Since language is not a science, the fact that you can qualify a sentence with a grammatical 'formula' like this does not necessarily give it any more weight.
    I left my homework. (Not OK)
    Similarly, contextually, they may be occasions when this is acceptable.

  5. #35
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    "I left my homework" is incomplete. The where part is left out.

    ~R

  6. #36
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    "I left my homework" is incomplete. The where part is left out.

    ~R
    E.g.
    A: I left my pen at home.
    B: Argghhh, whatever... I left my homework.

    Of course, the 'where' part is left out, but this:
    Quote Originally Posted by Mercian View Post
    Similarly, contextually, they may be occasions when this is acceptable.
    ...still stands.


  7. #37
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left


  8. #38
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    Default

    You said that 'I left my homework,' was incorrect, which I would generally agree with (with the implication that it was always so, which I wouldn't agree with). I was giving a natural-ish example in conversation where it might be perfectly acceptable English.

    Thus, Cas's way of putting grammar into a formulaic 'equation' does not necessarily apply to naturalness. English grammar is not logical.

  9. #39
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    Quote Originally Posted by Mercian View Post
    BTW, as a newb forgive me but I couldn't find an explanation of what these polls are for: acceptable standard usage (including vernacular and colloquialisms) or acceptable for teaching...?! I teach that 'forgot' in this context is wrong, but acceptable conversational colloquial AE.
    It's a poll, so it's designed to see what people think, with the possibility to discuss afterwards, as is happening here. Not all of them have obviously right or wrong answers.

  10. #40
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    Default Re: Forgot\Left

    Quote Originally Posted by Mercian View Post
    Since language is not a science, the fact that you can qualify a sentence with a grammatical 'formula' like this does not necessarily give it any more weight.
    Agreed. For example, taking apart a cell phone doesn't support anything either, but it does tell us what its made of and how those parts function as a whole.

    The second example is ambiguous:

    [1] I forgot X at home. <unintentionally>
    [2] I left X at home. <unintentionally or intentionally>

    The verb forgot can express intentionality; e.g., I purposely forgot X at home, but modification or context is required. [1] is not ambiguous, whereas [2] is. It houses by default more than one meaning.

    Knowing how something works is important.

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