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  1. #1
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    Default "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    #1. She was into drama and took part in many youth theater productions as well as singing in choirs.
    #2. He as well as I is satisfied with the result.
    #3. He as well as me is satisfied with result.
    My question is: Since #1 is proved correct, that means "as well as" is a preposition phrase, right? If it is so, then which is correct, #2 or #3? Isn't is right to put a object pronoun "me" behind a preposition phrase like "as well as"? If it is in that case, why I do I see people write #2? Does anyone write #3 rather than #2?
    Thanks for your answer in advance!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    "He, as well as I, is" is correct but I can't imagine anyone saying or writing such a sentence. Try "He and I are satisfied with the result."

    She was into drama and took part in many youth productions. She also sang in choirs.

  3. #3
    Amy Guest

    Default Re: "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    He as well as myself is satisfied with the results?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    I am satisfied.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    "myself" is reflexive. It must refers back to a noun or pronoun.

    EX: The cat cleaned itself.
    EX: I helped myself to the food.
    EX: You hurt yourself, didn't you?

    Reflexives myself, yourself, himself, herself, and so on cannot function on their own, and the reason "myself" is ungrammatical in this sentence:

    EX: He as well as myself ... <ungrammatical>

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "He as well as I ..." or "He as well as me..."

    "as well as" functions as a conjunction in #1, not a preposition:

    #1. She was into drama and took part in many youth theater productions as well as [took part in] singing in choirs.

    "as well as" has two functions:

    conjunction: courageous as well as strong.
    preposition: The rhetoric, as well as the reasoning, is appreciated.

    Notice the commas on each side of the prepositional phrase. They set off or bar the grammar from counting it as part of the subject. That's why the verb is singular "is", and not plural "are". Take the commas away and the prepositional phrase changes identity. It becomes a conjunction + noun phrase that's counted as part of the subject:

    conjunction: The rhetoric as well as the reasoning are appreciated.

    Below in #2a, there aren't any commas setting off "as well as" from the grammar, so it's counted as part of the subject. "He as well as I" is a compound subject so the verb should be plural "are" (#2b), not singular "is":

    #2a. He as well as I is satisfied with the result. <ungrammatical>
    #2b. He as well as I are satisfied with the result.

    Subject verb agreement is also a problem for #3a. "He as well as me" is a compound subject; the verb should be plural:

    #3a. He as well as me is satisfied with the result. <ungrammatical>
    #3b. He as well as me are satisfied with the result.

    Now, add in the commas and "as well as" functions as a preposition,

    #2c. He, as well as I, is satisfied with the result. <awkward>
    #3c. He, as well as me, is satisfied with the result. <awkward>

    As a conjunction, "as well as" joins two like forms;i.e., courageous as well as strong; you as well as Sam, but in #3b, below, "as well as" joins two unlike forms, the subject pronoun "He" and the object pronoun "me".

    #3b. He as well as me are satisfied with the result. <non-standard>
    #3d. He as well as I are satisfied with the result. <standard>

    Now, "as well as me" is non-standard English, but nevertheless speakers will use "me" as well as "myself" as a way of placing the other person above them. It's a way of humbling oneself.

    All the best.

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