Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40
  1. #11
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,736
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Getting spammy.... ???

  2. #12
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,845
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Homophone vs Homonym

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynne Hand
    I always thought that homophones are words with different meanings that sound the same, but are spelt differently and homonyms are words with different meanings that sound different, but are spelt the same.

    So a homophone would be - There was a mail from a male.
    And a homonym would be - The bandage was wound around the wound.

    :?

    PS You can practice your homophones here.
    Yes, but homonym is also the name for the larger category. Thus, all homophones are homonyms, but not all homonyms are homophones. If you use homonym to talk about a subcategory of homonyms you create unnecessary confusion. After all, both homophones and homonyms are homonyms. That confusion is unnecessary because you can call that subcategory heteronyms, and that word is already in use.

    :)
    I agree with you that this area of English is confusing. When one looks up "homonym" in the dictionary, one gets several definitions, all of which conflict with the others.

    I favor your method. Make "homonym" the main category and have it mean words that sound alike, are spelled alike, or both. Under that, let's have:

    1) homophone: words that sound alike, but are spelled differently.
    2) homograph (also called heteronym): words that are spelled the same, but are pronounced differently
    3) homomorph: words that are spelled the same and pronounced the same, but which have different meanings (and possibly different etymologies)

    The word "homomorph" is not in wide usage yet, and some dictionaries use "homonym" for that use, but they also use homonym for homomorphs and homographs/heteronyms.

    I prefer "homograph" to "heteronym" because of the name. "Homograph" means same writing, whereas "heteronym" means different name. Were it up to me, I would use "heteronym" for homomorphs that have different etymologies, but that would be far too confusing.

    If the civilized world is not open to "homomorph", then an alternative plan would be to not have a main category and reserve "homonym" (same name) for homomorphs (same form), words spelled alike and which sound alike.

  3. #13
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree with you, Mike. Let's keep homonym as the main category but eliminate it as a subcategory. After the rules are established we will then make everybody else follow them.

    :wink:

  4. #14
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,845
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I agree with you, Mike. Let's keep homonym as the main category but eliminate it as a subcategory. After the rules are established we will then make everybody else follow them.

    :wink:
    OK. I'll go with you on this one. What do think about "homomorph"?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,814
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I agree with you to make homonym as the main category. This is how I teach myself. But I'm not sure if I get the idea of "homomorph", that is, homomorphs may pronounce the same but function differently.


    boxes ==> plural suffix
    catches ==> verb suffix to indicate third-person-singular

    Is that right?

  6. #16
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I agree with you, Mike. Let's keep homonym as the main category but eliminate it as a subcategory. After the rules are established we will then make everybody else follow them.

    :wink:
    OK. I'll go with you on this one. What do think about "homomorph"?
    It looks good to me. Now we'll have to get everybody else to agree.

    :wink:

  7. #17
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I agree with you to make homonym as the main category. This is how I teach myself. But I'm not sure if I get the idea of "homomorph", that is, homomorphs may pronounce the same but function differently.


    boxes ==> plural suffix
    catches ==> verb suffix to indicate third-person-singular

    Is that right?
    No, I think those classifications would apply only to entire words, not suffixes. Here is Mike's definition of homomorph:
    • 3) homomorph: words that are spelled the same and pronounced the same, but which have different meanings (and possibly different etymologies)

    I think one example might be fine. As an adjective it means apt or appropriate. Or it is a word that expresses agreement or approval. Example: "That is fine with me." As a noun, it is a penalty. Example: "The man had to pay a fine."

    Mike, what do you think?

    :)

  8. #18
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,845
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I agree with you to make homonym as the main category. This is how I teach myself. But I'm not sure if I get the idea of "homomorph", that is, homomorphs may pronounce the same but function differently.


    boxes ==> plural suffix
    catches ==> verb suffix to indicate third-person-singular

    Is that right?
    No, I think those classifications would apply only to entire words, not suffixes. Here is Mike's definition of homomorph:
    • 3) homomorph: words that are spelled the same and pronounced the same, but which have different meanings (and possibly different etymologies)

    I think one example might be fine. As an adjective it means apt or appropriate. Or it is a word that expresses agreement or approval. Example: "That is fine with me." As a noun, it is a penalty. Example: "The man had to pay a fine."

    Mike, what do you think?

    :)
    Yes, it is whole words.

    duck - a bird
    duck - an action

    down - an adverb of direction
    down - feathers

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,814
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you, Ron and Mike. I've added a new vocabulay to my linguistic knowledge.


    homomorph=homonym+homograph

    bat - a tool for table tennis
    bat - an animal



  10. #20
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    13,845
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Thank you, Ron and Mike. I've added a new vocabulay to my linguistic knowledge.


    homomorph=homonym+homograph

    bat - a tool for table tennis
    bat - an animal


    Bingo! :wink:

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Words that have the same sound
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Oct-2004, 23:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •