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Thread: Impact

  1. #1
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    Default Impact

    Hi all,

    Should I write "impact on" or "impact to the"?

    Regards,

    Dean
    ADSkepticism

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Impact

    Quote Originally Posted by dean
    Hi all,

    Should I write "impact on" or "impact to the"?

    Regards,

    Dean
    ADSkepticism
    It depends on the context. What are you trying to say?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Impact

    Hi twostep
    My sentence is like this, "promotion can have direct impact to the/on patients's health"

    Regards,

    Dean
    ADSkepticism

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Impact

    Quote Originally Posted by dean
    Hi twostep
    My sentence is like this, "promotion can have direct impact to the/on patients's health"

    Regards,

    Dean
    ADSkepticism
    can have direct impact on patients' ....

  5. #5
    nyggus is offline Key Member
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    Question Re: Impact

    Hi:

    Dear Teachers, I'd like to know your opinion on the Usage note from the American Heritage Dictionary, which I give below.

    Thanks,
    Nyggus

    The use of impact as a verb meaning “to have an effect” often has a big impact on readers. Eighty-four percent of the Usage Panel disapproves of the construction to impact on, as in the phrase social pathologies, common to the inner city, that impact heavily on such a community; fully 95 percent disapproves of the use of impact as a transitive verb in the sentence Companies have used disposable techniques that have a potential for impacting our health. It is unclear why this usage provokes such a strong response, but it cannot be because of novelty. Impact has been used as a verb since 1601, when it meant “to fix or pack in,” and its modern, figurative use dates from 1935. It may be that its frequent appearance in the jargon-riddled remarks of politicians, military officials, and financial analysts continues to make people suspicious. Nevertheless, the verbal use of impact has become so common in the working language of corporations and institutions that many speakers have begun to regard it as standard. It seems likely, then, that the verb will eventually become as unobjectionable as contact is now, since it will no longer betray any particular pretentiousness on the part of those who use it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Impact

    My opinion is that the idea of language mavens either 'approving' or 'disapproving' of perfectly acceptable and common English usage is as regrettable as it is ridiculous.

  7. #7
    nyggus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Impact

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa
    My opinion is that the idea of language mavens either 'approving' or 'disapproving' of perfectly acceptable and common English usage is as regrettable as it is ridiculous.
    Hi. You see, Coffa, from the one hand, I agree with you totally. But from the other hand, non-native English speakers who must use English and follow some rules must have some source to base on. It is not easy to use the language in academic writing if one has no source of rules. My friend recommended the American Heritage Dictionary as a source that they use in US. Remember that work of academicians is always subjected to review, and the language issue is very important. It is so easy then to criticize ones work because one didn't apply "the rules". The problem is when those rules differ among those who review your work (and among different sources, e.g., dictionaries). Then: which source should I use? Maybe sometime my language will be criticized because of the "impact on" used (which, in fact, I use)?

    Best wishes,
    Nyggus

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