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Thread: grammar

  1. #11
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Re: grammar

    I am terribly sorry that it should be Either of the two books holds the opinion..... Is it correct to choose 'either' then?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    I should clarify something.

    "Either of the two" is OK as it stands,

    Pat: Which do you prefer, apples or bananas?
    Sam: Either of the two. One or the other. (or = singular)

    Pat: Which do you prefer, apples or bananas?
    Sam: Neither of the two. Not apples and not oranges (and = plural)

    "Either of the two books hold", however, is not OK. The reason being, The verb is plural in number, whereas "Either" is singular in number. The test question is testing you on subject verb agreement.

    Neither are here. (OK)
    Either are here (Not OK)

    Neither hold (OK)
    Either hold (Not OK)

    :D

  2. #12
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    Either is incorrect.

    8)

  3. #13
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Either is incorrect.

    8)
    :?
    I once came across the sentence in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English ( P438) :
    Either of the shrubs grows well in this soil. That's why I don't understand your explanation. Here either of is followed by pl noun.

    Jiang

  4. #14
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    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Either is incorrect.

    8)
    :?
    I once came across the sentence in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English ( P438) :
    Either of the shrubs grows well in this soil. That's why I don't understand your explanation. Here either of is followed by pl noun.

    Jiang
    Yes. Of course. Either means one or the other. Notice that Either takes a singular verb: grows. The word neither would include both of them, thus: "Neither of the shrubs grow well in this soil."

    :)

  5. #15
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    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    1a. is incorrect. Although, three quarters of an hour is spoken and written in English, its true form is 1b. Speakers omit the -'s time part, so 1b. is the better choice.
    Since I have never heard anybody say (at least that I can remember) three quarters of an hour's time I would say it is not the better choice. It is not even an option. I must disagree. An ESL learner is unlikely to ever hear the "better" choice.

    :)

  6. #16
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    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Either is incorrect.

    8)
    :?
    I once came across the sentence in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English ( P438) :
    Either of the shrubs grows well in this soil. That's why I don't understand your explanation. Here either of is followed by pl noun.

    Jiang
    Yes. Of course. Either means one or the other. Notice that Either takes a singular verb: grows. The word neither would include both of them, thus: "Neither of the shrubs grow well in this soil."

    :)
    I will have to disagree with that. The rules for "neither" are the same as for "either". In most cases, both words should take a singular verb.

  7. #17
    RonBee's Avatar
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    You are right, Mike. It should be: "Neither of the shrubs grows well in this soil."


  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    You are right, Mike. It should be: "Neither of the shrubs grows well in this soil."

    No blushing required! You answer so many questions in a day, I'm surprised you can keep anything straight. :wink:

  9. #19
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    confirmation

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    You are right, Mike. It should be: "Neither of the shrubs grows well in this soil."

    Dear RonBee,

    I feel uneasy to have disturbed you so much. So either is still incorrect?
    If it is could you please explain the difference between my sentence and the dictionary example?

    Thanks!


    Jiang

  10. #20
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    Re: confirmation

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    You are right, Mike. It should be: "Neither of the shrubs grows well in this soil."

    Dear RonBee,

    I feel uneasy to have disturbed you so much. So either is still incorrect?
    If it is could you please explain the difference between my sentence and the dictionary example?
    Let's focus on meaning. If I say Neither book A nor book B say a certain thing then what I say applies to both. In other words, book A doesn't say it and book B doesn't say it. What if I say either book says it? Does it mean book A says it? No, it doesn't. Does it mean book B says it? No, it doesn't. I can't make either apply to one book or the other and certainly not both. So I can't use either.

    What about the other example? What if I say "Neither of those bushes can grow in that soil"? What I said applies to both of them. Bush A can not grow in that soil, and bush B can not grow in that soil. What if I say "Either of those bushes can grow in that soil"? It's just the opposite. Bush A can grow in that soil, and bush B can grow in that soil.

    Does that help?

    :)

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