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  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #21
    Frankly, I would leave out the last clause in that sentence. There seems to be no point to emphasizing that they (the researchers) are interested in doing what they are doing. Thus, the sentence would be: "Meanwhile, research on cavitation bubble collapse and emission in liquids has also focused strongly on dynamics and mechanism."

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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Frankly, I would leave out the last clause in that sentence. There seems to be no point to emphasizing that they (the researchers) are interested in doing what they are doing. Thus, the sentence would be: "Meanwhile, research on cavitation bubble collapse and emission in liquids has also focused strongly on dynamics and mechanism."

    8)
    Dear Teacher:

    I think you are right. The last clause is repetitious and excrescent.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #23

    Vocabulary Building

    Vocabulary Building

    Dear Teacher:

    I think you are right. The last clause is repetitious and excrescent.
    I had to look up excrescent.

    ex·cres·cent (ĭk-skrĕs'ənt)
    adj.
    Growing out abnormally, excessively, or superfluously.
    Linguistics. Of or relating to epenthesis; epenthetic.
    ex·cres'cent·ly adv.

    e·pen·the·sis (ĭ-pĕn'thĭ-sĭs)
    n., pl. -ses (-sēz').
    The insertion of a sound in the middle of a word, as in Middle English thunder from Old English thunor.

    [Late Latin, from Greek, from epentithenai, to insert : ep-, epi-, epi- + en-, in; see en–2 + tithenai, to place.]

    ep'en·thet'ic (ĕp'ĭn-thĕt'ĭk) adj.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I don't think excrescent fits there, but I do get your point, of course.

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