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  1. #1
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    Default Correct Spelling

    I would appreciate some help. In an address title, which is correct
    Ms. Nicola Davies
    Ms Nicola Davies
    (one with full stop or one without full stop)
    thanks
    Nicola

  2. #2
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Correct Spelling

    Ms is the short form for 'Miss'. Traditionally, it comes with a full-stop but it has become common for people nowadays to drop the full-stop when writing names fro simplicity sake.

    It's similar to the writing of dates:

    traditional - 15th June, 2006
    present - 15 June 2006

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Correct Spelling

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc
    Traditionally, it comes with a full-stop but it has become common for people nowadays to drop the full-stop when writing names fro simplicity sake.
    No, that's not quite right.

    The full stop (or "period" in American English) is used in the US, but not usually in Britain.

    American usage is quite simple: if the word is abbreviated, use a period. Thus:

    Dr. is the abbreviation for "Doctor";
    Prof. is the abbreviation for "Professor".

    British usage seems baffling at first sight:

    Dr is the abbreviation for "Doctor";
    Prof. is the abbreviation for "Professor".

    Why the full stop in "Prof." but not in "Dr"?

    The rule is quite simple: if the last letter of the abbreviation is also the last letter of the full word, a full stop is not used.

    Mr, Mrs and Ms are all written without a full stop in British English, since "Mr" is an abbreviation of "master", and "Mrs" and "Ms" are abbreviations of "mistress". (Note: "Ms" is not an abbreviation of "Miss".) However, "Esq." has a full stop because it is the abbreviation for "esquire".

    Actually, "Miss" is an exception. It ought to be written with a full stop in both Britain and America, but is now treated as a word in its own right.

    British convention is not always very clear. Should the abbreviation of "lieutenant" -- "Lt" -- be written with or without a full stop? It's probably safer to write it with a full stop.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Correct Spelling

    Colonel has the same problem. I think the full stop is probably a good idea in both.

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