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  1. #31
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    Default Re: English Idioms and Sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Those are good. However, the expression is tie the knot (not knots).

    How about:
    • There's a silver lining behind every cloud.


    And:
    • You can catch more flies with honey than you can with vinegar.


    :)

    Thanks. Anything wrong with my examples? BMO
    For the second one, try:
    • Statistics shows couples that tied the knot in church stay together longer and are less likely to divorce.


    Re:
    • There's a silver lining behind every cloud.


    Meaning: some good can be found in every situation, no matter what.


    Re:
    • You can catch more flies with honey than you can with vinegar.


    Meaning: you are more likely to be able to get somebody to do what you want if you "sweet talk" them than if you threaten them or otherwise make negative remarks.

    :)

    Thanks. It looks like other examples are okay. "You can catch more flies with honey than you can with vinegar" is a good one; I have never heard of it.

    BMO

  2. #32
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: English Idioms and Sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    There's a silver lining behind every cloud
    In BE, we say 'Every cloud has a silver lining'.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: English Idioms and Sayings

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    There's a silver lining behind every cloud
    In BE, we say 'Every cloud has a silver lining'.
    I have been informed that that's the AE expression too.

    :wink:

  4. #34
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    What about:
    • He drinks like a fish.


    What does that one mean?

    :)

  5. #35
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    a pain in the neck

    Meaning: an annoyance. Someone who is a pain in the neck is annoying.

    Example:
    • Ron sure is a pain in the neck lately.


    :wink:

  6. #36
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    Give me a hand

    Meaning: help me

    Example:
    • Would you give me a hand with this?


    Or:
    • Would you like a hand with that?

  7. #37
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    the apple of your eye

    Meaning: the object of great affection

    Example:
    • He dotes on that little girl. She's the apple of his eye.

  8. #38
    whl626 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    the apple of your eye

    Meaning: the object of great affection

    Example:
    • He dotes on that little girl. She's the apple of his eye.
    Can it be on the reverse ? He's the apple of her eye ?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by whl626
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    the apple of your eye

    Meaning: the object of great affection

    Example:
    • He dotes on that little girl. She's the apple of his eye.
    Can it be on the reverse ? He's the apple of her eye ?
    Sure.

    :D

  10. #40
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    Dear teachers,

    Would you please take a look at the following idoms and examples? I am not sure the difinations are correct and the examples are grammatically sound. Thanks a lot. I notice there are quite a few viewers; ESL learners are interested in idioms and sayings like I am. Thanks. BMO

    1. (As) sick as a dog.
    Very sick.

    Example: “Linda, Brian is on the phone, he is asking if you are going to the Sunday school?” “Mom, please tell him it is something I ate at the party last night; I am sick as a dog, I can’t make it.”

    Do I need a "the" in front of Sunday school? Should "Sunday" be capitalized? Anything else wrong?

    2. A man is known by the company he keeps.
    By looking at your associates, people can tell what kind of person you are.

    Example: I am worried about my son. He hangs around with these people with long hair, tattoos in arms and chest, holes in pants, some wearing nose, tongue, and lip rings. A man is known by the company he keeps; I wish he would associate with well-dressed, mannered, and church-going people.

    3. (Buying) a pig in a poke
    Buying something without first checking it out can bring a surprise.

    Example: I am glad the old fashioned, arranged marriages of our great-grandparent’s generation are over. Without seeing each other until the wedding day, how would they know the person they were marrying did not have two noses? It was like buying a pig in a poke – it could be full of surprises.

    Should grandparent be plural and anything else wrong?
    Have a good day to you all.

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