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  1. #1
    Astro-D Guest

    Default What is the difference between following two sentence?

    Hello,

    What is the difference between following two sentence?

    She can give a big concert next year.
    She will be able to give a big concert next year.

    Thank you for your time.
    Astro-D

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: What is the difference between following two sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro-D

    What is the difference between following two sentence?
    What is the difference between following two sentences?

    She can give a big concert next year.
    She will be able to give a big concert next year.
    Without more context it is hard to tell what the difference is between the two sentences--if any. The first sentence might mean that while she cannot give a big concert this year she can do so next year. However, the second sentence could mean the same thing. There is really no reason to believe that the two sentences mean two different things.

    8)

  3. #3
    Astro-D Guest

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    Hello, RonBee.

    I quoted these two sentences from my grammar book.
    So, I have no context.
    Without more context it is hard to tell what the difference is between the two sentences--if any. The first sentence might mean that while she cannot give a big concert this year she can do so next year. However, the second sentence could mean the same thing. There is really no reason to believe that the two sentences mean two different things.
    Then, you use these two sentences without any distinction?
    Isn't there some difference of a nuance, or some difference of a tendency of a use?
    I thought that when a speaker states B, he or she dosen't have confidence than when he or she states A.

    A:She can give a big concert next year.
    B:She will be able to give a big concert next year.

    A:I can visit you tomorrow.
    B:I will be able to visit you tomorrow.

    My guess is not right?

    Thank you for your time. :)
    Astro-D

  4. #4
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    A:I can visit you tomorrow.
    B:I will be able to visit you tomorrow.
    There are differences between these two, and context would control the choice.

    I'd use the second if I had previously thought that I wouldn't be able to visit, but had just learned otherwise. I'd also use it if when I was less keen to do it, and 'can' when I was more willing.


  5. #5
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default

    I thought that when a speaker states B, he or she dosen't have confidence than when he or she states A..
    I don't think a person is indicating less confidence in his ability to do something because he says will be able to rather than can. Difference in form doesn't always indicate difference in meaning. Also, such a choice can be due to personal preference as much as anything else.

    A:I can visit you tomorrow.
    B:I will be able to visit you tomorrow...
    A: I can't visit you today, but I can visit you tomorrow.
    B: I can't visit you today, but I will be able to visit you tomorrow.

    No difference.

    8)

  6. #6
    Astro-D Guest

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    Hello, tdol.
    Hello, RonBee.

    Sometimes, these two mean the same thing.
    Sometimes, these two have different meanings because of context or personal preference.
    The difference between these two seems very slight.

    Thank you for answers. :D



    And, I have a questoin about
    I'd use the second if I had previously thought that I wouldn't be able to visit, but had just learned otherwise.
    Is this sentence the subjunctive mood?
    And is http://nori.zive.net/upload/storage/...3956_UE001.JPG the right reading?

    Thank you for your time. :)
    Astro-D

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