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  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    They are sat at dinner.

    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct?
    No, it is not.

  3. gwendolinest
    Guest
    #3

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:
    “Sat” is a widespread BE colloquialism for “sitting” (for example “there’s a bird sat on the fence”). This is very bad grammar IMHO, and it seems to be an exclusively BE problem. I don’t think it’s found in AE at all.

    ()

  4. Anonymous
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    #4
    Right. I've never heard here.


    We can also say: We are sitting at the dinner table.



    Does anyone do that anymore?

  5. Anonymous
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    #5

    Re: They are sat at dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tianshan
    They are sat at dinner.


    Is the above sentence correct? If so, how does it differ from:

    They sit at dinner.

    Thanks! :wink:

    We can say: They are sitting at the dinner table.

    They sit at the dinner table every evening at seven o'clock.

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    #6
    In fairly formal British English, I have heard 'sit to dinner', meaning the action of sitting at the table. :D

  6. Anonymous
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In fairly formal British English, I have heard 'sit to dinner', meaning the action of sitting at the table. :D
    That sounds very odd to my AE perception of English. I would tell someone that it is simply wrong. I've never heard in any context "sit to dinner". To me, it simply sounds like the wrong preposition.


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    #8
    I don't use it, but I've heard it. I don't think I've ever taught it, either.

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